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      CommentAuthorgroundxero
    • CommentTimeOct 5th 2009
     (6964.1)
    oldie

    Nobel Winners Isolate Protein Behind Immortality, Cancer


    This year’s Nobel Prize in medicine went to a trio of scientists who discovered the enzyme telomerase, which allows cells to divide without any limits, making them effectively immortal.

    It may be nature’s greatest double-edged sword. Coax cells into producing telomerase, and they will survive indefinitely, but they will also become cancerous.

    and
    “In the absence of a comprehensive understanding, it’s very dangerous,” Muller said. “We have to figure out how to do maintenance on our telomeres.”

    Muller thinks humans could live for 90 to 210 years once scientists know more about the molecular basis of aging.

    “If we could figure out how to do maintenance, we could extend our lives,” he said. “But it has to be done very carefully, and we’d have to have a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism. ”
    •  
      CommentAuthorhowyadoin
    • CommentTimeOct 5th 2009
     (6964.2)
    It really does my heart good to know that I'm part of one of the last generations to not live forever.
    • CommentAuthorZJVavrek
    • CommentTimeOct 5th 2009
     (6964.3)
    Stuff like this keeps getting discovered, proven, etc. It kind of creeps me out.

    Of course, by "stuff like this", I mean the scientific discoveries which would become the foundations of technologies I imagined for a cyborg role-playing character of mine. I'm not sure how comfortable I am with the premises I made up five years ago actually being born out by science.

    Oh well, at least his nanotechnology is still impossible. (I eventually decided that it was powered by magic.)
    •  
      CommentAuthorallana
    • CommentTimeOct 5th 2009
     (6964.4)
    i'm starting to think i should've gone into science. i want immortality so, so badly.
  1.  (6964.5)
    "Immortality" when you're talking about cells is somewhat different than the immortality most of us mean. Just because cells can copy themselves over and over again doesn't mean they can't die.
  2.  (6964.6)
    ...this gives me a good enough idea to warrant a rewrite of a comic.
    • CommentAuthorFlabyo
    • CommentTimeOct 6th 2009
     (6964.7)
    Why is it all I can picture is some desperate person injecting themselves full of this stuff, only to go all 'Tetsuo from the closing scenes of Akira' on us.
  3.  (6964.8)
    It really does my heart good to know that I'm part of one of the last generations to not live forever.


    I've long had the sneaking suspicion we're all going to get our jet-packs and flying cars about two weeks after I die
  4.  (6964.9)
    Its always nice to see reality catch up with fiction.
    Deadpool
  5.  (6964.10)
    @Flabyo

    KANEDAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
    •  
      CommentAuthorDavies0010
    • CommentTimeOct 6th 2009
     (6964.11)
    I'm honestly surprised this has been awarded the nobel prize. Or rather, that it's only now been awarded the nobel prize, as i've been taught about telomerase for 3 years at university. Seems almost old news now.
  6.  (6964.12)
    Or rather, that it's only now been awarded the nobel prize, as i've been taught about telomerase for 3 years at university.

    The Nobel prize in science is often award years, sometimes decades, after the work it is awarded for. I was actually kind of surprised to see this award given that telomerase research might never lead to anything especially useful.
  7.  (6964.13)
    Yes! We'll all live to be 200 but look like walking tumors!
  8.  (6964.14)
    Bleh. Immortality is overrated.
    •  
      CommentAuthorarklight
    • CommentTimeOct 6th 2009
     (6964.15)
    LOL at the Akira reference!



    Heri

    http://www.youtube.com/thearklight
    • CommentAuthorchris g
    • CommentTimeOct 6th 2009
     (6964.16)
    "Nah, sometimes I kinda WANNA die."