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  1.  (7178.521)
    somehow i have gone my whole life without seeing this
    wahhhhh

    i am a fraud
  2.  (7178.522)

    What do you think about the up and coming trend of motion comics? DO you think it will last or is it something that will be looked back on in a few years in a "WTF were we thinking" kind of way? And if you think they last, what series would you like to see become motion comics?


    it's all nickelodeons, phenakistoscopes and zoetropes right now. the hardware isn't there yet. as a (reformed) animator it tends to drive me batty because it makes me just want to make a cartoon instead.

    brian and alex's SPIDERWOMAN is well thought out and conceived; i thought WATCHMEN was as hoary and ridiculous as the Marvel '66 cartoons... but it's all prototypes right now.
  3.  (7178.523)
    I really liked the SPIDERWOMAN motion comic. I only watched the first issue, but I thought it was good. I don't think they could ever take the place of an actual comic that you can hold in your hand and flip back and forth at your leisure, though.
  4.  (7178.524)
    Actually, you sort of brought up a point there that I wanted to ask--
    At your level, how do assignments usually work? Like, what goes into the process of pitching something beyond writing the pitch?

    Say, you got a bug up your ass and had a great idea for Ultimate Moonstone. Do you email (actually, I'm not even sure who the Ultimate U's primary editor would be) well, that person and say: Hey, I have an idea for Ultimate Moonstone!
    Or, is it more along the lines of them coming to you and saying: "We want to do Ultimate USAgent" and you reply: "Oh, that'd be great, can I put Ultimate Moonstone in there?"

    Or is it looser than that?

    Oh, also with you being sick, I remembered another discussion awhile back about health care-- (you don't have to answer if you don't want to) but as a newish freelancer, I'm currently running without it. Do you guys get company health care?
    (Last time this discussion over on the Bboard Pia Guerra popped in, made fun of us for being American and then broke her own foot with a mallet just prove how awesome unified health care is. She's hardcore. And I am joking.)
  5.  (7178.525)
    I hope this doesn't offend, but I thought it was pretty funny. An excellent issue, by the way.

  6.  (7178.526)

    At your level, how do assignments usually work? Like, what goes into the process of pitching something beyond writing the pitch?


    sort of the same way they always did, but i'm more of a known quantity and i know all the editors. you'd ask, hey, what's up with X and find out, then go from there. You write up a one-sheet, or at least walk the editor through the idea, outline, etc. the process is very similar still.

    sometimes editors will float offers, but even then, you've still gotta, like pitch your take on it.

    no, no health care.
  7.  (7178.527)
    I hope this doesn't offend, but I thought it was pretty funny. An excellent issue, by the way.


    hm. not funny. what WAS funny was the guy that put in lines from DR. HORRIBLE in the Tony meets Thor in a graveyard scene. The entire team thought that was hilarious.
  8.  (7178.528)
    "The Chinese Professionals?" That looks AMAZING!

    Like, "Master of the Flying Guillotine" amazing! Complete with a one-armed boxer!
    •  
      CommentAuthorkellysue
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2009
     (7178.529)
    //no, no health care.//

    Just to clarify, we do not have health care provided to us through an employer, but we do have health insurance that we purchase on our own.
    • CommentAuthorTim Simmons
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2009 edited
     (7178.530)
    "Just to clarify, we do not have health care provided to us through an employer, but we do have health insurance that we purchase on our own"
    Quotes keep coming out weird on my end--

    But anyhow, yeah-- I'd presumed as much, with a child it would be frighting not to. I shudder to think of the number of parents in this country who aren't covered and/or can't afford it.
    Funny, now that I'm out of my 20s, these are issues that I think about a lot more. At 24 it would have been: Hey kid, wanna write comics? Sure do!
    Now: Hey, want to write comics? Hmmm, do I get health coverage?

    (Edit: And just to note, I know it isn't common in this industry to provide health care-- or, really, in any field where you're freelancing. I was just curious if Marvel offered it.)
  9.  (7178.531)
    Dammit, did I kill the Q&A by bringing up sres topic helath carrz?

    Ok, fine:
    Better Peanut Butter: Smooth or Chunky?
  10.  (7178.532)
    Dammit, did I kill the Q&A by bringing up sres topic helath carrz?


    I think it might have been my "full retard" img
    • CommentAuthorchris g
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2009 edited
     (7178.533)
    Dear Matt,

    Just want to thank you so much. I got into Casanova ever since Warren mentioned it on his blog some years back. It was the coolest comic around and it introduced me to the work of Gabriel and Fabio. I have been buying up anything by them ever since ^_^

    As for my question well, I have been trying to articulate it all week and still can't so here goes: I saw Warren and Paul Pope on twitter casually mentioning what it would be like to have the freedom to create a comic unhindered by any fixed format. Would you ever like to do something like that if you had the time and/or artist crazy enough to draw it? Like the comics version of a self-indulgent guitar solo. Conversations and/or fight scenes going on for as many pages as you want. Something like that.

    ALSO: Any desire to try a webcomic like Freak Angels in the future?
    •  
      CommentAuthorfabiomoon
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2009
     (7178.534)
    Hey Matt,

    These X-Men folks are HARD to get a grip of, you know?
  11.  (7178.535)
    and horror comics have over horror film what any comics have over film, yknow? they're each discrete, distinct media with discrete, distinct techniques to evoke story, mood, and provoke effect.


    This strikes me as absolutely right. As a reader of comics, I get twitchy when people treat them as nothing other than storyboards for (potential) films -- it seems to waste the potential of the medium. Still, I think that concepts from the other arts can be useful in thinking about comics, and wanted to get your take, and any other creator's if they're interested, on the following quote from Steve Lieber. In a tiny footnote in the back of Whiteout, he says the following:

    It's best not to get me started on comics as a rhythmic--as opposed to a literary--medium. I tend to judge a page of comics by how the pictures sound, and I'm very aware of what a weird sentence that is. This isn't synesthesia. I just sort of hear panels and pages in my head as if I were reading a musical score. When the rhythm is off, the page doesn't work. When it's particularly good, the work comes to life in a way that's hard to communicate. Conversations with a number of other cartoonists lead me to believe this is a fairly common experience.


    Now, I'm not sure that I can make total sense of this, particularly the stuff about "how the pictures sound." But, as a musician, I do think I understand what he means by reading comics as if he was reading a musical score. (This is particularly interesting when thinking of the experience of reading things without panels, like The Nightly News.) Anyhow, knowing that you're a musical cat, does anything Steve says here resonate with you? (And again, I'd love to hear from Fabio, Warren, KellySue, David, or anyone else who's working on comics.)
  12.  (7178.536)
    might've also been that i have the flu and just took a nap, guys, jeez...
  13.  (7178.537)
    I saw Warren and Paul Pope on twitter casually mentioning what it would be like to have the freedom to create a comic unhindered by any fixed format. Would you ever like to do something like that if you had the time and/or artist crazy enough to draw it? Like the comics version of a self-indulgent guitar solo. Conversations and/or fight scenes going on for as many pages as you want. Something like that.


    but a comic as long as it needed to be is different than a self-indulgent guitar solo. yes to the former-- of course yes, a thousand times yes-- and no to the latter, which'd just be interminable beating off.

    ALSO: Any desire to try a webcomic like Freak Angels in the future?


    not today, no.
  14.  (7178.538)

    These X-Men folks are HARD to get a grip of, you know?


    lookit that stubby little wolverine?

    and where are the GIRLS?
  15.  (7178.539)
    that should've read
    "lookit that stubby wolverine!" with an exclamation point, because that drawing is awesome.
  16.  (7178.540)
    does anything Steve says here resonate with you? (And again, I'd love to hear from Fabio, Warren, KellySue, David, or anyone else who's working on comics.)


    yeah, but, like steve, i dunno how to articulate it. i'm a fiend for writing in time signatures and grids for that extra..uh... rhythm, i guess, i hear in my head when i see it.