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      CommentAuthorMJSM
    • CommentTimeDec 1st 2007
     (72.1)
    Alright. So as it turns out my housemate has been lying his ass off about me to the landlady (coincidentally, his mom). As a result, even though the landlady has invited me to stay in a different room, I am getting the hell out of here.

    Now, one thing that has bugged me about my housemate for a while is that he has a 4 month-old puppy and no idea how to raise it. He is constantly just screaming at it and beating it for no reason, or because it crapped on the rug 6 hours ago. Obviously the puppy doesn't remember what it was doing six SECONDS ago, let alone six HOURS, and has no idea why he's beating it.

    Anyway. As a farewell "gift," I would like to leave him and his mother a book on how to properly raise a dog along with a nice note on how it's probably already too late to undo all the psychological damage he's caused, but that it might be nice for him to be good at at least one thing in his miserable, coddled, pointless life.

    Any suggestions on good dog raising/rearing/training books? I've had a dog back home for 15 years, so I haven't had to "raise" one for a long time.
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      CommentAuthorAriana
    • CommentTimeDec 1st 2007
     (72.2)
    All interpersonal human relationships aside -- If your housemate has been hitting and screaming at a puppy, then you might want to consider leaving a farewell "gift" of a call to the humane society. A book is likely to end up just being a chew toy for the dog to practice its frustrated killing rage on, and if the thing even manages to live that long, in a few years there's probably to be one more murderous cur roaming the streets trying to eat children.
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      CommentAuthorAriana
    • CommentTimeDec 1st 2007 edited
     (72.3)
    (Others may suggest you just kill and eat the puppy before it can grow up to become a hell beast enemy of man. That's because those people are nicer than I am, and think humans should be saved from dogs. I say if you're silly enough to let them in the house with you, you deserve what you get. Then again, young meat is tender and delicious. Your call.)
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      CommentAuthorMJSM
    • CommentTimeDec 1st 2007 edited
     (72.4)
    Oh, I fully intend to call the humane society as well.

    I realise a forum run by Warren Ellis is hardly the place to ask for constructive advice about dogs, of course.
    • CommentAuthorGerald
    • CommentTimeDec 1st 2007
     (72.5)
    If this was a discussion about resources for trying to raise a dog properly, I'd point you to Cesar Millan's second book, Be The Pack Leader. There are lots of tips for dealing with unruly dogs and training methods. On the other hand, this seems like a situation where this person shouldn't be allowed to have a pet.

    Side note: Dogs are remarkably resilient, and can be wonderful pets, even after suffering years of abuse.
  1.  (72.6)
    AND THEN THEY SUDDENLY GET UP AND EAT YOUR FACE
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      CommentAuthorMJSM
    • CommentTimeDec 1st 2007 edited
     (72.7)
    My suggestion is not to have such a delicious face!

    Thanks for the book suggestion, Gerald. Hopefully the Humane Society will agree that he's no fit pet owner.
    • CommentAuthorrobb
    • CommentTimeDec 1st 2007
     (72.8)
    "truth about dogs" by budiansky. but if you're roommate's enough of a schmuck to beat the animal, he may be too lazy to read several words forming sentences. then your only hope is bookmarking "dog whisperer" episodes, which underneath the annoying production and hair gel has some quality information.

    it's not too late to re-warp the puppy into a manageable dog. loads of beaten shelter dogs get reaccustomed to someone not trying to make their lives hell.
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      CommentAuthorMJSM
    • CommentTimeDec 1st 2007
     (72.9)
    Do you happen to know if any of these books come in Chinese translations, preferably Mandarin? His family are first-generation immigrants to Vancouver and, living in Richmond, haven't had much reason to learn English in the past 13 years.
    • CommentAuthorjohndavid
    • CommentTimeDec 1st 2007
     (72.10)
    If this was a discussion about resources for trying to raise a dog properly, I'd point you to Cesar Millan's second book, Be The Pack Leader. There are lots of tips for dealing with unruly dogs and training methods. On the other hand, this seems like a situation where this person shouldn't be allowed to have a pet.


    cesar's first book is very helpful as well. one of the books i learned the most from was "how dogs think" by stanley coren but if your roommate hasn't taken enough time to already be reading books on proper dog training it might be a little much of a read for him.
    • CommentAuthorStefanJ
    • CommentTimeDec 1st 2007
     (72.11)
    Cripes, what a situation. You're a mench for thinking about the puppy. I hope it works out.
  2.  (72.12)
    Cesar Milan is definitely the best when it comes to learning how to interact with a dog properly. Both of his books are amazing. It is too bad that the puppy has to be left behind.
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      CommentAuthorARES
    • CommentTimeDec 2nd 2007
     (72.13)
    Kidnap the dog. If you don't want the dog for yourself, give it to someone who would. Leave behind some sort of present for the lad in the form of an axe to his face.

    Dislaimer: I'm a dog person, not really a people person.
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      CommentAuthorVespers
    • CommentTimeDec 3rd 2007
     (72.14)
    Seconding the dognapping idea
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      CommentAuthorWilson
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007
     (72.15)
    I say cook it and share the meat with a cat but I hate dogs. I had a bad experience once as a child.
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      CommentAuthorSarpedon
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007
     (72.16)
    It's people like that that make dogs into things that will:
    SUDDENLY GET UP AND EAT YOUR FACE

    I fully expect this from all dogs but people seem to smooth out what I assume to be an intense desire on the dog's part to try to mangle me or do me some sort of harm.
    Renegade's got something like the right idea.