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  1.  (7348.21)
    It'd probably be moderately less damaging that current aquaculture practises. Then again there's those massive schools of Nomura jellyfish popping up due to global warming and the fact we've eaten most of their predators - maybe this woudl be something we could harvest them for.

    Seriously doubt the people paying $1000 a kilo for Tuna sashimi would go for the vatgrown version though.
    • CommentAuthorFan
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2009
     (7348.22)
    And those magical omega 3 fatty acids from fish like tuna and salmon can also be found in walnuts or linseed oil


    DHA comes from algae, apparently: fish get it from algae. There are DHA food supplements being made directly from algae: suitable for vegetarians, and incidentally without the toxins which bioaccumulate in fish.
    • CommentAuthorOddcult
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2009
     (7348.23)
    Bamboo's a fast growing and readily available nutrient, right? I'm sure you know where I'm going here.
    • CommentAuthorOddcult
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2009
     (7348.24)
    Also, Eucalyptus.
  2.  (7348.25)
    My understanding is even though bamboo's super fast, it's tough to process. It just doesn't break down, ever. That's why biodiesel types go for algae, which is already sludge.
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      CommentAuthorSlick
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2009
     (7348.26)
    @Brendan that spoils the pandaburger joke though
    • CommentAuthorOddcult
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2009
     (7348.27)
    How about plankton?
  3.  (7348.28)
    Still thinking through some stuff here.

    If they can get the texture right, this would be great for all the game meats and luxury meats. In principle it shouldn't cost more to grow cultured pheasant; quail; lobster, venison etc than pork or beef.

    Whale meat - this could take away just about the last excuse the Japanese have for continued whaling.

    Pate: let's face it, texture isn't going to be an issue.

    Caviar: this is a big step up in complexity because you'd need to grow whole ovaries rather than just an undifferentiated muscle mass but this might save the Beluga sturgeon.
  4.  (7348.29)
    If this brings down the cost of luxury meats they’ll cease to be luxury meats. Just as the wealthy stopped buying most of Mercedes and BMWs offerings when the C Class and 3 Series took the brands down a notch in price (doing wonders for Maybach and Lamborghini) they’ll ditch specialty meats as well. But it would be great for game birds that have hardly any meat to speak of—I love quail but won’t eat it because I hate picking at those little bones.
  5.  (7348.30)
    Seriously doubt the people paying $1000 a kilo for Tuna sashimi would go for the vatgrown version though.


    Yeah, that's an interesting question. Is there a subconscious part of us that appreciates eating meat more because they know it's from a creature that was once alive? Which appreciates the "taste"of the cruelty?

    The story of the food is important when we buy it and when we consume it. Many people simply reject any food which they feel is artificial, even when that is a positive thing. They like authenticity in their food and psychologically that influences the way it tastes to them.
  6.  (7348.31)
    On the other hand, you just have to launch it on the back of some foot-and-mouth/BSE/swine flu (yes I know you can't catch swine flu from meat but it would still work) type panic. The advantage of vat-grown meat being that you know it's not been anywhere it shouldn't, touching animals that it shouldn't.
  7.  (7348.32)
    "Is there a subconscious part of us that appreciates eating meat more because they know it's from a creature that was once alive?"

    I think it's more the snob appeal.

    There'll always be people who insist the real stuff tastes better, like there are people who pay hundreds of dollars for gold loudspeaker leads.
  8.  (7348.33)
    They like authenticity in their food and psychologically that influences the way it tastes to them.

    People like authenticity because that’s what they’re told to buy. From the 1950s to the 1980s people were told to buy all kinds of horrible processed crap. Twinkies, instant coffee, American cheese, frozen fish sticks, etc., people ate that shit up because that’s what the food industry told them to buy. Then the organic craze hit, and big agriculture realized it could make more money selling people organic foods. Two decades and millions of dollars in advertising later and people are paying extra to get specialty foods that are little if not at all different from what they were buying before.

    It’s the same with music. Pop and hair metal tanked, so the record industry spewed out gangsta-rappers and grunge bands and made a fortune selling it all as real or alternative. When pop tanked just a few years ago they did it again with stripped down rock bands like Jet, the White Stripes, etc.. Each time people ate it up because there were lots of people telling them that it was authentic and better and what they needed.

    So all industry needs to make vat-grown food work is a profit motive. As soon as vat-grown meat that tastes good and costs less to make than the real stuff is ready to go the campaigns will start. It will be safer—Grown in Sterile Hydroponic Food Systems!—more consistent—Tastes Perfect Every Meal!—healthier—Always Low in Fat!—easier to cook—No Bones or Chunks of Fat!—and so on. People will get these messages from every media system, slowly replacing the organic/free range messages, and in a few decades only cranks will still eat dead animals.
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      CommentAuthorFinagle
    • CommentTimeDec 7th 2009
     (7348.34)
    I don't think it'll be *cranks* exactly who only will still eat dead animals - but the same people who eat beef tartare now might. A foodie thing.
    • CommentAuthorKosmopolit
    • CommentTimeDec 7th 2009 edited
     (7348.35)
    It will be safer—Grown in Sterile Hydroponic Food Systems!—more consistent—Tastes Perfect Every Meal!—healthier—Always Low in Fat!—easier to cook—No Bones or Chunks of Fat!—and so on.


    "Good for you and good for the planet."
    • CommentAuthorIsaacSher
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2009
     (7348.36)
    Or the obvious catering to vegetarians. "This steak is pain-free." Or portray slaughtered real meat as messy, gross, dirty, and morally inferior to "Perfect Pork", "Freedom Chicken", or "Absolute Beef" or whatever they'll brand it as.
    • CommentAuthorPooka
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2009
     (7348.37)
    bwhaha! Freedom Chicken...heh
    • CommentAuthorIsaacSher
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2009
     (7348.38)
    Oh, you know they'll have cute names for it. "Vat-grown meat" just sounds icky. I used to be a receptionist at an Advertising Agency, they're *all* about "branding", like a religion.

    Porkette? Life Lobster? Super Steak?

    Now it's starting to sound like the Legion of SuperFoods...
  9.  (7348.39)
    And then of course...

    There's Numeat.
    •  
      CommentAuthorcosta_k
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2009
     (7348.40)
    @ IsaacSher

    I would read "Legion of SuperFoods". In a heartbeat.