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      CommentAuthorMickierat
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010
     (7593.101)
    @nadya

    You can still be led to your true passion through corrupted sources.

    So very true, especially for me. Everyone I know who makes great art/music/writing/performance is at least partially inspired by at least some mainstream bits they experienced and found those things lacking of something more.
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      CommentAuthorRudi
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010
     (7593.102)
    Just delurking to say that I have all four issues, and have been fortunate enough to purchase 2-4 at a local Barnes and Noble here in Minnesota. I have noticed the amount of issues for each subsequent issue increase each time, from 1 for number 2, to 3 to number 3, and 5 for number 4. I hope bookstore sales continue to grow for you ladies and it's still thought of as a method of distribution in the future for you. Thank you for providing a dose of the muse and smart brain food for an aspiring creator.
  1.  (7593.103)
    @Zoetica - Happy you like the Jodorowsky and Morrison interviews! What about them surprised you, Encephalo?

    Meredith said it better than I could've; Dunno about Encephalo Ray, but I'm still reeling that Mark even landed that Jodorowsky interview. It really doesn't get much more epic, uber, or legendary oddballish than the man behind The Holy Mountain, let alone the man who Almost Made Dune With Moebius and Salvador Dali.

    I think it's also a little awe inspiring that you all managed to maintain this sleek sort of composure and professionalism whilst interviewing someone that you've waxed lyrical about at one point or another. It's a thing I'd have trouble doing. I mean, I think it was through Coilhouse that I was introduced to Jodorowsky. Wasn't there a piece on El Topo a little while ago? Or have I gotten mixed up?
    • CommentAuthorTam-Lin
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010
     (7593.104)
    Sorry if you've addressed this somewhere else, but is there any chance of you putting out back issues that are sold out in some sort of digital form? I like having the physical magazine, but I also like having access to favorite things from wherever I am.
  2.  (7593.105)
    Hello ladies of Coilhouse, long time lurker, first time poster. Ugh, that sounds a bit too much like calling into a morning zoo show for my taste.
    The mental image of Mr. Ellis in oversized novelty sunglasses, rubber chicken in hand does amuse though.
    Sorry haven't had my coffee yet, so my train of thought is all over the place. More of a statement than question really. The discovery of alternative culture has played and continues to play a huge part in shaping my life. Some of the things I remember most about that discovery was the sense of wonder, the mystery and enchantment of all of it. The feeling of finding a place where you were valued instead of ostracized for being a bit strange or different. Feeling like you were part of a secret society yet there was a...kindness, a very welcoming feeling to all of it. Sometimes it feels like thats been lost over the years, theres a bigger thought there but I cant quite reach for it at the moment. My long rambling point, simply put, is this, thank you for doing what you do, for bringing back all the best parts of that discovery to me, for making me nostalgic yet pushing me to think forward at the same time. and thank you for doing what you're doing here at Whitechapel. It's not often you get a look at how the sausage is made, a peek behind the curtain(sausage curtain?) at things and end up loving them all the more for it.
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      CommentAuthorTheremina
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010 edited
     (7593.106)
    The mental image of Mr. Ellis in oversized novelty sunglasses, rubber chicken in hand does amuse though.

    ...that's not a chicken. O_o

    The feeling of finding a place where you were valued instead of ostracized for being a bit strange or different. Feeling like you were part of a secret society yet there was a...kindness, a very welcoming feeling to all of it.

    YES. And have you noticed that the further off the beaten path you go, the more kind and more genuine your interactions tend to be? When there are fewer rules or signposts to follow, your bonds go deeper. The kinship is less about established uniforms or cliques or trends, and more about the pure joy of sharing similar interests and the excitement of potentially discovering something even more incredible together around the corner. I know it's a paradox (since ultimately, we're cultural disseminators) but that's a feeling we hope Coilhouse can hang onto.

    Sometimes it feels like thats been lost over the years, theres a bigger thought there but I cant quite reach for it at the moment.
    I know what you mean. I think that globalization, the internet, the ease with which we can obtain and process new information, tends to make us more jaded more quickly. Been there, done that, rode the ride, bought the t-shirt, told all my friends about it, got bored, ditched it, what's next? Fresh stimulus needed. Gimme more. I'm definitely guilty of that, sometimes. (Thankfully, boredom is like the common cold -- ubiquitous, but transient, and rarely life-threatening.)

    There's a sort of thoughtless "gimme" state that's probably always been a part of human nature, but it seems more entrenched these days, somehow. Maybe because there has never been a time where we were more thoroughly bombarded with information. This has amplified certain more cynical traits. But still, I think regaining that sense of kinship and discovery is entirely possible if you're willing to actively engage. It's hard work to be world-weary! I think being jaded is some sort of fear or pain-based default setting that's pretty simple to reset.

    Oh shit, now who's rambling?! Sorry.

    My long rambling point, simply put, is this, thank you for doing what you do, for bringing back all the best parts of that discovery to me, for making me nostalgic yet pushing me to think forward at the same time.

    Thank you so much, John. We'll never get tired of hearing that. We're definitely not in this for the money or glory, but statements like that are very nourishing.
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      CommentAuthorTheremina
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010
     (7593.107)
    Sorry if you've addressed this somewhere else, but is there any chance of you putting out back issues that are sold out in some sort of digital form? I like having the physical magazine, but I also like having access to favorite things from wherever I am.

    Tam-Lin, that's a good question. We honestly haven't discussed making full back issues available in digital form. Select articles and layouts, yes... but not the full back issues. It's worth thinking about, though.

    Nadya, Zoetica, thoughts? Warren, I'm curious to know what you think about this particular possibility as well...
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      CommentAuthornadya
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010 edited
     (7593.108)
    Nadya, Zoetica, thoughts? Warren, I'm curious to know what you think about this particular possibility as well...

    It's worth thinking about, for sure! I think it's just a matter of time - we're so busy hustling on the new stuff, it's hard to get back to the old stuff. Also, it's a question of format. Would we make the format similar to something like ISSUU? How do guys you feel about the page-flippy thing (personally, I always thought it was a wee bit gimmicky, but looking at their site more, I actually find the magazines quite readable). The thing is, some articles look great on the page, but not so great on the screen. I dunno!
  3.  (7593.109)
    Nadya, Zoetica, thoughts? Warren, I'm curious to know what you think about this particular possibility as well...

    It'll cost you money in the reformatting -- I imagine you'd have to put it into PDF, but it would probably still need rejigging.

    Mind you, I know people experimenting with algorithms to reflow InDesign files into an e-reader-style format...
  4.  (7593.110)
    Wow, thank you for the incredible response,
    you picked up on the thought I had, expressed it beautifully and managed to inspire me at the same time.
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      CommentAuthorTheremina
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010 edited
     (7593.111)
    I think it's also a little awe inspiring that you all managed to maintain this sleek sort of composure and professionalism whilst interviewing someone that you've waxed lyrical about at one point or another. It's a thing I'd have trouble doing.

    Hahaha. Personally? There's very little sleekness or composure anywhere in sight when I'm sitting face to face with someone whose work inspires me! That's true whether they're super famous or completely obscure. I'm just generally an excitable person. But professionalism, yes. That I must hold myself to. Always. It's very important for me (and for the interview subject as well) to know that the interview is worth everyone's time.

    For me, these are the keys to a good interview with a personal guru: engage them respectfully, knowledgeably, and without timidity. Regardless of how deeply their work or persona resonates with you, treat your subject as a fellow human being, not like some sort of iconic demigod. Come properly prepared with interesting questions and insights. Don't let the interview be overtly about your own personal attachment to their work or persona. Never treat your interview with a sense of entitlement. Do not act overly familiar, but don't be supplicating, either. If you can balance all of these elements --and they too behave professionally-- that's when some of the most fascinating conversations happen.

    It sounds more difficult than it is. There are a lot of constructs in place when you meet with someone to conduct an interview. It's a more neutral territory than if you're encountering a persona like that at a party, or backstage, or in a signing line or whatever. To be honest, for me, meeting a personal hero is a lot more terrifying under more socially ambiguous circumstance. (Green rooms, for instance, make me incredibly nervous. I've been introduced to Nick Cave three times now and each time, I have managed to act like a complete ass.)
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      CommentAuthorTheremina
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010
     (7593.112)
    Mind you, I know people experimenting with algorithms to reflow InDesign files into an e-reader-style format...

    Are you talking about Matt and BERG and the Mag+?
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      CommentAuthornadya
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010 edited
     (7593.113)
    It'll cost you money in the reformatting -- I imagine you'd have to put it into PDF, but it would probably still need rejigging.

    Warren's right. We actually don't have archives of the final PDFs for Issues 02, 03 or 04 - our printer, Westcan, has them. We never really had the "final copy" on anyone's laptop, because there are always tons of corrections after this gets sent to the printer. I'll ask them if they could send the PDFs back to us. If Westcan kept the entire project on file, that will be amazing. If they only kept the PDFs on file, it'll be a LOT more difficult, but still doable. I'll write them an email and see what's up. On a related note, I learned that they recycle the plates after the issue is printed. So, if we wanted to reprint Issue 04 tomorrow, they'd have to make new plates all over again. Just an FYI for my co-editors!
  5.  (7593.114)
    Nadya - Kindness, curiosity, creativity, sense of humor. Whoops, that's four. And people who possess the latter three qualities on that list, but not the first one, are the most dangerous people you'll ever meet.

    I'm curious - dangerous in what sense?
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      CommentAuthorTheremina
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010 edited
     (7593.115)
    As promised, a sneak peek of some (very happy, glowy) folks we're covering in Issue #05:





    These were shot by our trusty staff photographer Allan Amato in NYC a few days ago, shortly after Amanda Palmer and Neil Gaiman publicly announced their engagement. I've never seen Amander smile like this. Not on camera or off. These portraits make my heart go squee.
  6.  (7593.116)
    Are you talking about Matt and BERG and the Mag+?

    Yarrrr. Jones took me through it in the pub the other week. It is much clever.
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      CommentAuthorTheremina
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010
     (7593.117)
    Ooo. I bet it is. The demo was verrrrrreh sexeh.

    Can't wait to see where they go with the tech.
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      CommentAuthoroldhat
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010 edited
     (7593.118)
    Are there any immediate plans to make coilhouse distributed to stores internationally?
    •  
      CommentAuthorMarkPowell
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010
     (7593.119)
    @Encephalo Ray

    re: Jodorowsky, we'd had (very) sporadic email contact for a while after I interviewed him for a UK film mag in mid-2007ish. Coilhouse arrived to punch a hole through the supermationweb infohighsite's very soul at around the same time IIRC, and of course it was immediately obvious that Jodorowsky and our Vikings Of Subterranean Industry were, like, totally IN A TREE. But it was really when the print edition was born that a shotgun wedding became kinda inevitable, I think.

    I sent him links, he said yes. Credit to the 'Haus peeps, I'd call that.

    In fact, Mer, I never really fully told you this, but we actually got the provisional go-ahead chuffin' aaaages before I dared mention a word of it to you (which I only felt comfortable doing when I'd finally got a date etched in stone, ten feet high - yep, the date that subsequently moved). But seriously, like a whole print issue before, roughly. That was a tough one to sit on, I don't mind saying...
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      CommentAuthorTheremina
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010
     (7593.120)
    Mark, you're a mensch. I'm so glad it worked out. Thanks again.