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      CommentAuthorrickiep00h
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2010
     (7593.121)
    Oh poop. #4 has sold out. Time to pray that I can find it in a bookstore...

    Congrats, of course. Sold out in a hurry, this one.
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      CommentAuthorcelan
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2010
     (7593.122)
    Really? I guess I ordered in the nick of time.
    "Double ditto" on the congrats.
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      CommentAuthorZoetica
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2010 edited
     (7593.123)
    Apologies for yesterday's absenteeism - I'm in the middle of drawing the Inform/Inspire/Infect section dividers for Issue 05 and couldn't manage to get my head out of the inkwell. Anyway, some thoughts about putting out back issues in digital form and otherwise.
    I think it's just a matter of time - we're so busy hustling on the new stuff, it's hard to get back to the old stuff. Also, it's a question of format. Would we make the format similar to something like ISSUU? How do guys you feel about the page-flippy thing (personally, I always thought it was a wee bit gimmicky, but looking at their site more, I actually find the magazines quite readable). The thing is, some articles look great on the page, but not so great on the screen.

    I can certainly see publishing select layouts online, and think that at a future, less busy point in time we'll do just that. Ultimately though, we do the magazine because we love print and Courtney designs it with print in mind, so seeing it all online would be like taking away its sweet n' pulpy soul. For instance, I can't imagine seeing most of 04 on the screen - all those rich textures and details would flatten out and the mag would be reduced to a blueprint of its former self. I would love to eventually do actual reprints, at perhaps five issues per thick compilation, with beautiful re-designed covers and bonus content.
    A common theme that comes up around here is what Warren listens to while writing. Is there anything in particular that you, collectively or individually, often have playing while you create?

    I love Headphone Commute and listen to the Modern Classical mix Mer mentioned [listening to it right now, actually], along with tons of their other great complications while working. If you haven't poked around their site yet, I recommend you do. As far as personal playlists go, my "Workmode ON" mix right now is all snug favorites: Autechre, Fuck Buttons, Battles, Ben Frost, Boards of Canada, Clint Mansell, Cylon, Dirty Three, Ekkehard Ellers, Emeralds, Explosions in the Sky and Svarte Greiner.
    What do you think are the three most important qualities in a person?

    Oh this is downright impossible, but I have to try. Just three, huh? Open-mindedness, yes, all-embracing creativity, life-spanning vigor.
    I think it's also a little awe inspiring that you all managed to maintain this sleek sort of composure and professionalism whilst interviewing someone that you've waxed lyrical about at one point or another.

    Time for a nano-anecdote about professionalism! Nadya and I nabbed Ron Moore for Issue 02 by sneaking into the VIP section of a BSG screening at The Edison and forcing issue 01 on him. It totally worked, though I will always wish we'd interviewed him after the finale.
    It's not often you get a look at how the sausage is made, a peek behind the curtain(sausage curtain?) at things and end up loving them all the more for it.

    Behind the Sausage Curtain is now the name of my new prog band. Thank you.

    • CommentAuthorjzellis
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2010
     (7593.124)
    The mental image of Mr. Ellis in oversized novelty sunglasses, rubber chicken in hand does amuse though.


    Which Mr. Ellis? This is what I wear to work in my day job as Kreezy The Amphetamine Klown at Circus Circus here in Las Vegas, though I'm not sure how anybody on Whitechapel would know that, unless you're a fan....

    Actually, I assume you must be talking about Warren "Big Scary Internet Beardy Jesus Man" Ellis, since you refer to "Mr. Ellis", and I am referred to by polite company as "Dr. Ellis", thanks to my thoughtful purchase of a Doctorate of Divinity from the Universal Life Church, which was roughly 1/1000th the price of a "real" doctorate and roughly as useful in the job market. Particularly when one is applying for Amphetamine Klown positions.

    Oh, God, this Percoset is making me feel funny. Please continue with your interrogation of the Ladies.
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      CommentAuthorTheremina
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2010
     (7593.125)
    For Rickiepooh (and anyone else who missed the online store cutoff):

    Here's a complete list of B&N stores carrying #04.
  1.  (7593.126)
    Thank you Zo, had a dreadful day but that made me grin like an idiot. LOVE Battles and Explosions in the Sky, (listening to them as we speak) so I will definitely be checking out Headphone Commute and the other bands you mentioned.
    Another question for all.
    Have you ever thought of doing a piece on Emma Goldman?
    The recent events in Haiti, or more specifically some of the "why are why helping those people?" comments in the media (and i've heard it in just general conversation as well), brought to mind the basic thrust of a speech of hers I heard when i was a teenager about how patriotism ultimately just breeds contempt for your neighbors. Her story potential aside I think she's a fascinating historical figure and would be interested to hear your thoughts regardless.
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      CommentAuthornadya
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2010
     (7593.127)
    Also, Coilhouse has never covered or mentioned Angela Carter despite her work being very coilhausy.

    What's stopping you from writing an article on her?

    Seriously. If you want to see something in Coilhouse, how about writing an article about that something?

    Sometimes, you just have to let it marinate. Especially if it's something you really care about.
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      CommentAuthorTheremina
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2010
     (7593.128)
    Have you ever thought of doing a piece on Emma Goldman?

    Interesting! No, I personally hadn't, but now that you mention it, she is a fascinating and controversial historical figure, deserving of recognition for her activism on behalf of women, gays, atheists, etc. We really should give her a shout-out on the blog, at the very least. Thanks for suggesting her!
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      CommentAuthorTheremina
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2010 edited
     (7593.129)
    Sometimes, you just have to let it marinate. Especially if it's something you really care about.
    Nadya, I'm not sure, but I think Jess was asking why Stratocirrus wouldn't write the article themselves, not us.

    Which reminds me. SUBMISSIONS:

    Our coilhouse [at] gmail [dot] com address is swamped, guys, completely fucking overwhelmed, with emails from folks wanting to contribute tips, or pitch their writing/art/photography for the magazine or the site. For every genuine pitch or tip we receive, there are maybe 120 spam emails, and 50 more astoundingly unprofessional "BLOG/PRINT MY BAND/ART/ETSY STORE BEEYOTCHES" type missives. The signal-to-noise ratio gets very exacerbating. We're already stretched really thin keeping everything else running, so we barely ever check the damn thing anymore.

    So, anyone in the Whitechapel readership who's thinking "hey, I might like to try my hand at writing about something I love for Coilhouse, just for kicks"-- any WRITERS viewing or participating in this thread would like us to check your work out, heads up. Now would be a good time/place to give us your calling card.

    You'll need to have a proper portfolio/resume/sampling of articles available online. Post a link here, in the thread. Give us a BRIEF introduction about what kind of subject matter you'd be interested in writing about for the blog. EMPHASIS ON BRIEF. (No fiction, no poetry, no personal stream-of-consciousness rants, no slashfic please. Well, okay, maybe slashfic... but just for the giggle factor.)

    Blogging for Coilhouse would not a paying gig, mind you. But if you're interested in doing it for fun and padding your resume (and you write grammatically solid, engaging journalistic stuff) we're definitely looking for fresh blood from people who won't need much hand-holding or editing.

    If you're a good fit, we will know it when we see it. Just, please, don't be offended or discouraged if you don't hear back from us.

    ALSO:

    Loving the suggestions for subject matter to cover. You guys have great taste. Keep 'em coming! I'll go put a fresh kettle on.
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      CommentAuthorTheremina
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2010
     (7593.130)
    Also, apropos of nothing:



    WHEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!
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      CommentAuthorallana
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2010
     (7593.131)
    can i ask the un-kosher question? can you guys put a dollar figure on the cost of the first issue? how much money was made or estimated-to-be-made on pre-sales/orders? how much money did the three of you actually risk on the venture originally?

    (it's late and i may have missed this info if it was shared already.)
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      CommentAuthorArcko
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2010
     (7593.132)
    My dear ladies of Coilhouse. Mer, Nadya, Zo, in this world of Facebook Feeds, Tweeting and hyper-individualized blog updates, I feel like I know you guys as well as anyone I might share a few pints with down at the local goth club. It never ceases to amaze me the intricacy of the connections amongst prominent creatives across the net or how they might translate to the fleshy, sunlight filled space offline. Who knew a -Con and a little booze could bring everyone together so nicely? I remember seeing posts on Whitechapel promoting Coilhouse, but I figured that they were a natural recourse to the awesomeness of the magazine finding its away across the net and not through a direct connection to Warren.

    Anyways, I suppose my question revolves around the concept of exposure (the mostly clean kind). Over the past year or so, I have been doing my best to begin to create the framework to launch myself as an internet focused artist to better help my career, self-fulfillment and see if I can actually contribute something to this great artistic world that we all try to nurture. Now, as I progress toward my goal, I cannot help, but feel that I am being held back by my surroundings. I come from a sleepy little city of three quarters of a million people known as El Paso, TX. You would think that the sheer population would foster a strong, healthy environment of arts and community, but this is not the case. This city has a reputation for sending talent running like rats from a sinking ship. The city is perpetually stuck five years behind it's time and is voraciously opposed to change. Some of our best and brightest run for hills the first chance they get and never return. My question then is, in your experience, would you think it best that I also take my will and ideas and abandon ship or take the noble route and stay to help the community grow? Part of me wants to cultivate what I can and give back to the community, but another part of me feels that I will not reach my personal peak if stay in such a limited setting. Deeply personal decision, but I'd value your input.

    -Arcko

    P.S. Have you guys gotten your mitts on Dodge'm Logic, Alan Moore's newest print venture ? Quite the little magazine start-up and what good he is doing for the community. I hear he's using the menial profits to buy a local basketball team some new uniforms.
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      CommentAuthorrickiep00h
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2010
     (7593.133)
    Mer - My closest B&N is in Valpraiso, IN (or, I suppose Toledo...) Both of which are like 2.5 hrs away. My sister-in-law, though, is a ten-minute walk from Chicago Comics. She is checking. If not there, then I might have to make a long drive. Thanks for the head's up, though.

    I'm still kicking myself for not getting this sooner, considering how much I talk you folks up...
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      CommentAuthorTheremina
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2010 edited
     (7593.134)
    Hi, Arcko! Thanks for the kind words.

    I have to say, I don't feel comfortable advising you without knowing you... a few questions: How old are you? I'm guessing early to mid twenties? (Forgive me if I'm wrong.) Have you lived in El Paso all your life? Do you have children or a partner to think of? IS there a creative community there that you feel particularly bonded to, or do you feel dissatisfied, disconnected? Would you be able to afford to leave town and move to a bigger city for a while? Portland? Seattle? Philly? Bay area? LA? Chicago? New York? Hell, Austin, even? If you couldn't afford to move a big glitzy city for a year or more, do you think you'd be able to set aside the time and money to just travel to places you've never been for a few weeks, either in the States or abroad?

    Again, I don't know you or your situation, but I will offer this:

    If you are young, and if you have your health, and if you are free, and if you have not had the opportunity to live elsewhere as an adult before, and if you are courageous (because it does take courage to leave the sleepy little city you grew up in), and if you can afford to leave (or you're willing to make sacrifices to save enough to be able to leave), by all means GET THE HELL OUT OF DODGE...er, El Paso. At least for a little while. Six months, a year. Try something new.

    Go out into the world. Push your own boundaries. It sounds like you want to. You can always plan to come back to El Paso if you miss it. You can always plan to return one day, to dig in and help foster a community and cultivate the arts. You can still do that when you're a bit older and wiser and more worldly. But you may not always have the freedom, physical constitution, or mental acuity that you do when you're young, so now's the time to go out into the world and explore.

    Also, I want to directly address this:
    I have been doing my best to begin to create the framework to launch myself as an internet focused artist to better help my career, self-fulfillment and see if I can actually contribute something to this great artistic world that we all try to nurture.

    The internet is a wonderful tool for artists, for networking, for building community. But I don't know that making a name for yourself online should be a focus. (Maybe I'm misinterpreting you, but it sounds like that's at least partly what you want to do.) I think your top priority should be to nurture yourself first. I don't know about anyone else, but my own self-fulfillment comes from making tangible things and connections. Again, it's not my place to tell you how to spend your energy, but I will say that I worry about folks who spend too much time consciously thinking about how best to "launch" themselves online or whatever. Really, the most important step you can take as a young (or young-at-heart), driven, creative person who wants to build community and kinship is to just get out there and live. In the physical world. Hey, and then you can blog about it afterward if you feel like it... but you don't hafta!

    Good luck. I hope at least some of this blather helps you, somehow.

    PS: Thanks for the reminder about Dodgem Logic. It came out when I was in the middle of moving to New Zealand, and I hadn't remembered to pick up a copy yet. I just bought one online.
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      CommentAuthororikae
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2010
     (7593.135)
    You guys snagged me with #4. I love it. Gonna keep on buying them.
  2.  (7593.136)
    I have the other issues (early buy-in since numero uno), but slacked on this one. Now it looks like I must drive out from my suburban hole and seek out a B&N. Thanks for the list, Theremina!
    • CommentAuthorTam-Lin
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2010
     (7593.137)
    OK, new question, I think. Which sort of relates to the whole taste tribe issue, I think, and is a followup to the El Paso question. I'm glad, of course, to be informed that you sold out of issue number 4, but disappointed to find out that the print run was 1000, just as I'm sort of disappointed to find out that the esteemed Mr. Ellis has only sold ~708 copies of Shivering Sands, because I like to think there are more people than that out there like me, and rightly or wrongly, I tend to partly base that decision on the media people consume.

    So I'll ask: how do you end up finding people you resonate with? I'm still at something of a loss to figure out how Mr. Ellis manages to build communities around himself; you three seem to do be doing something similar, although there's a fairly large overlap between the one you're building and Warren's, I suspect.
  3.  (7593.138)
    Um, hi.
    Another Russian CH friend here - Mme. Tanya V, who you may or may not have seen as an occasional contributor over at the site, and in Issue 4.

    I have a LOT of reading to catch up on and look forward to doing that tonight.

    Just thought I'd say hello, for now.
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      CommentAuthorZoetica
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2010 edited
     (7593.139)
    Hi, Tanya! Have a cookie and a cuppa, yes?



    Tam-Lin, first, a correction: 1,000 is not our print run, it's our web store supply. When we say we've sold out of issue 04 in our web store, it means just that. All hope is not lost, you can see the list of retailers who carry us here.
    How do you end up finding people you resonate with?

    When we started out, we really weren't sure we would find people we'd resonate with, or to what extent. The ultimate goal was to put out a print magazine, but only if we found our audience. Though all three of us had a bit of an audience already thanks to Nadya's photography, Mer's music and my art and fashion column, we were very fortunate to get a push from our friends like Warren and Gala Darling when we officially launched the blog. It was the combination of all these factors that laid the foundation of our community. Since, we've gained momentum and readership by word of mouth combined with new audiences brought over by the peeps we've featured and all our wonderful new writers. In that sense, the Coilhouse community is a happy little swarm of asteroids, hurling through the internet and beyond.
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      CommentAuthorMike Black
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2010
     (7593.140)
    This week's been a fantastic look inside Coilhouse. Thank you folks for stopping in!