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      CommentAuthorjbowline
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2010
     (7632.41)
    Weren't you on the WEF? Am I misremembering? Was it The Engine? It's not possible that I only know you from Twitter, is it?

    I was a lurker on the WEF and a very rare poster on The Engine. As far as I'm aware, you'd only know me from Twitter. But hey, at least I'm memorable.

    New question, and I will not be upset or insulted if you choose to pass on it. In Fraction's last residency, you made mention of recovering from addiction. From some simple math, it seems that you were pretty well into adulthood when you kicked whatever you were addicted to. It's obvious that such an experience would affect your life. Do you feel like you "lost" some of your 20s, for example, or were any of your "big life decisions" delayed (intentionally or otherwise) because of what you went through?

    I appreciate your and Fraction's candor; I'm interested in hearing about what you've experienced from someone so good at expressing their thoughts.
  1.  (7632.42)
    Hi Kelly Sue! It's nice to see you around here again. I enjoyed your contribution to Fraction's residency quite a bit. I hadn't caught that you were doing Marvel work; has anything been announced besides Sif?

    Someone asked about Tallulah, and I'm honestly curious about HL. Why Henry Leo? Where'd that come from?

    (My legal first name is Henry, but I grew up with my mom calling me Brandon — long story. All "Henry" ever got me was made fun-of in high school, but now I see folks like you and Fraction, Jess Nevins and Colin Meloy naming their kids Henry... I'm curious what this resurgence is about.)

    You talked about your daily routine — what's it like on the writing end? How do you structure your daily writing time?

    Thank you for doing this!
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      CommentAuthorkellysue
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010
     (7632.43)
    Wow this is awesome!
    this is the first time I've come across an adaptor@o@
    Pleased to meet you, I'd always believed that the people behind the english publication of Japanese manga I've read were like a mysterious force that never surfaces. I've been deceived^^


    Oh my goodness. I feel inadequate to the mystique!

    Could I please ask: what is your standing on OEL manga??
    Do you read much?
    How involved are you?


    I'm not sure what you mean by "my standing" on OEL? Are there people who are for or against it? Is this a contentious issue? I'm sort of indifferent, to be honest with you. (I fear this is where I disappoint you.) I'm not even sure I understand the concept. Are OEL comics simply English language comics done in a Japanese style? If so, what aspects? Roughly 200-page digests? Japanese-influence in art-style? In narrative? (A discussion of the latter would fascinate me.)

    Or does this simply refer to original English language books put out by publishers who have traditionally imported and adapted books from overseas?

    How do you think the balance between the import of popular Japanese series and the internal development of new western manga should be handled?


    Given my answer to your previous question, I'm clearly unqualified to weigh in.

    I like good comics. I don't care where they come from. And ultimately, I think grouping all Japanese comics together does the incredible breadth of styles and subjects a disservice.

    I found out about the residency through a post on Emma V's LiveJournal and I've been kinda involved with just chatting to some fellow new small press comic creators via Sweatdrop. I've started looking into the British manga scene and I'm just starting to come to terms with the how much is going on out there^^
    What advice would you give to new OEL comicker's like me about working in the industry, and how can you see the situation changing over the next few years?


    I suppose I'd give you the same advice I'd give any aspiring creator? THINK, but try not to be so critical of your own work that you paralyze yourself. Don't be deterred and keep striving to improve.

    I wouldn't advise anyone to focus on making American manga. (I don't even know what that is.) Focus on the story you want to tell.

    ...

    That sounds like such greeting card dreck, but it's sincere.
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      CommentAuthorkellysue
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010 edited
     (7632.44)
    I've posted in some of the other residency topics about working to become an opinion columnist. Just wanted to get your view on what it takes for a person's work to grab your attention enough to follow them.


    What sort of opinion columnist?

    I'm a big fan of Ellen Goodman, but I don't read her weekly or anything.

    I'm not sure I can actually think of an opinion columnist that I read regularly.

    Hm...

    I do wish you luck, though. I think that's a noble aspiration. (It's like wanting to be a professional thinker.)
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      CommentAuthorkellysue
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010
     (7632.45)
    If only people knew how peculiarly sweet this is.


    I think I need "peculiarly sweet" on a t-shirt.
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      CommentAuthorkellysue
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010 edited
     (7632.46)
    What would surprise people most about translation gigs?


    That I'm not actually a translator, probably. Adapter is such an awkward job description. And rewriter is almost worse. Dialogue editor probably comes closest to fitting the bill.

    What was it like working on Matsumoto's Blue Spring?


    Utterly terrifying. I am such a fan of Matsumoto... on the one hand I didn't want anyone else to touch the book and on the other, I was near-paralyzed with the fear of fucking it up.

    What's it like being one of two professional writers in a family?


    I guess the best I can offer is that it's almost exactly what I imagined it would be. The biggest difference between the fantasy life that Fraction and I used to imagine aloud when we first met and our current reality is that we don't share an office.

    What can you tell us about your upcoming projects?


    Boy. You'd think I'd be dying to get to that question, wouldn't you?! Unfortunately the answer is NOTHING! Literally nothing that I have in the works is cleared for discussion yet.

    I'm probably allowed to say that I do have more work for Marvel in production and that I have a few anthology pieces for other publishers in the works. Also that I'm working with CHUCK BB, who is crazy-awesome.
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      CommentAuthorkellysue
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010
     (7632.47)
    I keep thinking of something to ask, but I can't come up with anything useful. So, in the meantime I'm gonna ponder over photos of HL's awesome lunch boxes.
    Hi Kelly Sue!


    HELLO MULLER!!

    I just made myself giggle. That's embarrassing.

    Dude, I am such a fan of YOUR work. Really and truly.
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      CommentAuthorkellysue
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010
     (7632.48)
    You'll have to excuse me as I squeal over the fact that you did Sensual Phrase. I love that series, in all its deeply melodramatic glory.


    YAY! That book was So! Much! Fun!

    And "Tropical Butterflies Alive in Winter" is one of my favorite stories in 24Seven. (Fraction's "Static" is deeply, deeply disturbing.)


    Ain't it?!
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      CommentAuthorkellysue
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010
     (7632.49)
    First off, thanks for doing one of these.


    You're so welcome.

    And if I haven't said it expressly just yet, thanks to you and everyone else in this thread for you interest--not just in me and my stuff, but for... what am I trying to say? For giving a damn.

    Secondly, I had a question about your upcoming Sif one-shot. Did you in particular pick Ryan Stegman as an artist, or was he someone Marvel recommended? I ask because I'm excited, I liked his work on The Riftwar adaptation.


    DUDE. I'm excited too! I do a silly little dance in my chair every time art comes in. I think he's fantastic and I'm not sure how I got so lucky.

    I want to say that HE WAS MY IDEA ALL ALONG, but that, sadly, is a lie. CB suggested him to Alejandro, I think. I did do a chair dance when they showed me his samples, though. I want credit for that!
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      CommentAuthorkellysue
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010
     (7632.50)
    I really want to know this whole story now...


    The funny thing is, it's probably already on the internet somewhere.

    There are already some really great questions in here, so for now I'll just say hi, sit back and enjoy.


    Hi! It's nice to see you, as always.
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      CommentAuthorkellysue
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010
     (7632.51)
    What tips would you give a wannabe writer with , no degree or learned schooling in writing other then two G.C.S.E’s in English lit and language, no working experience as a writer and no real clue where to begin…………I know big ask.

    Sure you have hundreds but just one or two will be a great help to me


    What's a GCSE?

    You could do worse than starting with Zinsser's ON WRITING WELL.
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      CommentAuthorkellysue
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2010
     (7632.52)
    Okay; back to work with me! Later.
  2.  (7632.53)
    Sam Humphries, you know the answer to this question.

    I want to see White bust out the double McTwist 1260, baby.


    Oh, I know, and you know I'll be watching too.
  3.  (7632.54)
    I have a few questions. Dun dun dun...

    1. Will you and the family be making another appearance at heroescon this year?

    2. Knowing that you and Fraction are both working on Asgard-related projects at the moment, do you share creative ideas about what to do with the characters and where you're wanting them to end up, or is it a solo process?

    3. I've recently started churning out short stories, some of which I would like to turn into web-comics, comics, or graphic novels. What would you say some of the most important things to keep in mind are when converting from one medium to the other?
  4.  (7632.55)
    Webcomics, comics and graphic novels are all part of one medium.
  5.  (7632.56)
    yeah, i mean from short stories to that medium. Sorry if it wasn't clear.
  6.  (7632.57)
    Dude, I am such a fan of YOUR work. Really and truly.


    Thank You!
    (And I haven't forgotten yet. Just bizzeeeee!)

    The biggest difference between the fantasy life that Fraction and I used to imagine aloud when we first met and our current reality is that we don't share an office.

    Do you still want to share an office or do you think it would be too distracting?
    • CommentAuthorRobson
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2010
     (7632.58)
    KS, thanks for doing this - it's been illuminating to read about your processes and home life.

    She used to be a professional actor.

    I keep forgetting about this aspect of your creative life - what're some of your favorite roles?

    For Shakespeare, do you prefer the comedies, histories, tragedies, or none of the above?
    • CommentAuthorOldAuntAmy
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2010
     (7632.59)
    My darling wife,
    Do you think that it's coincidence that lo these many years ago, I was assigned Tallulah's Lament as my title for Week 32's assignment on the MLF?
    Week 32: Titular Titters
    And to keep slightly on track, who are your favorite writers working today?
    Piles of love,
    OAA
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      CommentAuthorkellysue
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2010 edited
     (7632.60)
    EEE!!!

    Amy, Amy, Amy! How I've missed you, m'dear.

    Oh, you've gone and gotten me all misty.

    Sniff.

    (The Tallulah thing kind of blows me away. I had no recollection of that at all.)

    Anyway.

    I actually came by to say that the residency is meant to wrap up today and I haven't answered all your questions and I'm not going to get to all of them before the witching hour. (I somehow started, um, cleaning my office and now it's 2:30 and I have actual work I have to do today and the kidlet has to be picked up by 5. Oops.) If Warren and Ariana will indulge me, here's what I'm thinking: any questions posted before midnight tonight, I promise to address over the weekend. Then on Monday we can lock up the thread.

    Is that cool?