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      CommentAuthorgroundxero
    • CommentTimeFeb 6th 2010
     (7712.1)
    New Spider-Man Device Could Let Humans Walk on Walls

    livescience.com – Tue Feb 2, 5:50 pm ET


    A new high-tech suction device could allow humans to walk on walls like Spider-Man or create adhesive devices that could be turned on and off with the flick of a switch.

    The contraption, inspired by a beetle that can hold on to a leaf with a force 100 times its weight, uses the surface tension of water to make an adhesive bond, but it does so with a creative twist. It could be used to create sticky shoes or gloves, researchers said today.

    The device consists of a flat top plate riddled with tiny holes, each just a few hundred microns (a millionth of a meter) wide. A bottom plate holds water. In between is a porous layer. A 9-volt battery powers an electric field that forces water to squeeze through the tiny holes in the top layer.

    The surface tension of the exposed droplets makes the device grip another surface - much the way two pieces of wet glass stick together. Turn the electricity off, and the bond breaks.


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    •  
      CommentAuthorMrSmite
    • CommentTimeFeb 6th 2010
     (7712.2)
    This could be a significant find for the BDSM community... (I'm just looking at the possibilities for everyday use.)
  1.  (7712.3)
    I'd be more concerned about whether or not the surface could hold up to someone's weight being leveraged upon it.
    • CommentAuthorgzapata
    • CommentTimeFeb 6th 2010
     (7712.4)
    @seantaclaus- you know, I always wondered about that with spiderman
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      CommentAuthorgroundxero
    • CommentTimeFeb 6th 2010
     (7712.5)
    spiderman

    But I digress...
  2.  (7712.6)
    I'd be more concerned about whether or not the surface could hold up to someone's weight being leveraged upon it.


    Yeah, I doubt the glue on the wallpaper would be strong enough to hold a full grown man.
  3.  (7712.7)
    That is going to be awesome until your ankle snaps and your full weight rolls on it.
  4.  (7712.8)
    The best use I see for this is in zero gravity. Good news for space travel, I guess? Someone build us a space hotel and let us climb on all the walls, please.