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      CommentAuthorjoe.distort
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2008 edited
     (775.1)
    imagine this: it is 1970 , and you just heard BLACK SABBATH or THE WHO
    or
    it is 1978, and you just heard MIDDLE CLASS or THE MISFITS
    or
    it is 1982, and you just heard NAPALM DEATH or THE NEOS
    or
    it is 1996, and you just heard ATARI TEENAGE RIOT or MAN IS THE BASTARD or CROSSED OUT or CHARLES BRONSON

    ...and you thought to yourself, "where the hell can things go from here?"
    well, its 2008, well into what we wouldve called "the future" in the 80s. where do you see extreme music in five years time? styles, instruments, speed, influences-i wanna hear what you think. then, and only then, will i chime in. i have some very specific predictions, and i wanna hear yrs first. LETS GO!
    • CommentAuthorOddcult
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2008
     (775.2)
    Fucking great question.
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      CommentAuthorARES
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2008
     (775.3)
    I think that King Crimson's last album, what Kayo Dot does, how Meshuggah sounds, where Neurosis treads, and the essence that is Old Man Gloom are the future sound of music. I consider that music forward thinking, trying to do new things that haven't been done before.
  1.  (775.4)
    i was actually just going to order the kayo dot cd (along with a few other things), ROBOTIC EMPIRE is having a huuuuuge sale, everything on cd is five bucks.
  2.  (775.5)
    well with the likes of dillinger escape plan, agoraphobic nosebleed, pig destroyer etc being both ridiculously technical, fast, ultra violent etc etc, god only know how it's going to get any more so.

    personally i think the biggest development will be mixing genres together more and more, but succesfully...
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      CommentAuthorliquidcow
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2008
     (775.6)
    If you listen to old extreme metal albums, they often sounds like a blur, but newer ones which have higher production values are far more clear, which gives you some idea of what bands in the past might have been aiming for. A good example is Nile - Black Seeds of Vengeance is impenetrable at times, but on Annihilation of the Wicked you can pretty much hear everything that's going on. I think that better technology and production standards will do a lot for the advancement of extreme music - as long as bands are willing to embrace it, which some aren't, preferring to remain 'old school' or whatever.

    If you went back and played some of today's music to someone of a few decades ago, it may well seem incomprehensible to them, and it's the same with the music of the future. I'm not imagining some kind of space music, just that it would be something we are very unaccustomed to.

    But I guess I'm talking about the far future... I know maybe people have always said it, but with bands like the Berzerker, Nile, Akercocke, reaching speeds well past 200BPM, I don't know if it's possible for musicians to play much faster. As for all this 'technical' stuff (whatever 'technical' really means I think is up for debate), I don't know how much longer that can go on. I think Meshuggah's new one seems to show that there's only so much they can do with their formula. I'm not saying Meshuggah do this (I'm thinking more of DEP and others), but relying on constant tempo changes and unusual time signatures isn't really a musical style in itself, and eventually it will wear out. Then again, there's plenty of bands doing the Neurosis-meets-Godspeed thing and making it ultra slow and dramatic as well. There is no one particular direction that music is headed in anymore, in 5 years time, who knows, there will be lots of bands doing lots of different things, I doubt much of it will have not been done before, but you never know. I don't think that many artists have emerged in the last 5 years who are doing something incredibly new, I've mostly been discovering bands who've been around for a while already.
  3.  (775.7)
    If you went back and played some of today's music to someone of a few decades ago, it may well seem incomprehensible to them, and it's the same with the music of the future. I'm not imagining some kind of space music, just that it would be something we are very unaccustomed to.


    thats kind of where i am going with this...my prediction for new types of extreme sounds is that we probably cant guess it. i have a feeling that tech grind will advance to the point where it is almost just power electronics with a fast as fuck beat to it, power violence will stay about the same because the scene is saturated with traditionalists, bands like AN ALBATROSS will get way more psychedelic rather than faster, and black metal will become something indecipherable from the originators of that sound started with. i do think that SOMETHING will come along that we just will have never seen coming, but i dont even know where to begin guessing.
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      CommentAuthorJaredRules
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2008
     (775.8)
    People are gonna be making more and more fucked up sounds and rythms electronically.
    Glitched out techno mindfucks. Laptop bands are the wave of the future.
    • CommentAuthoromer333
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2008
     (775.9)
    sunn0)) and BORIS are the future of extreme music with little bits of Baroness and bands of that ilk tossed in for good measure.
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      CommentAuthorExploder
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2008
     (775.10)
    It'll just be the sound of cultists butchering children as celebrity vocalists make mooing noises.
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      CommentAuthorwilliac
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2008
     (775.11)
    An Albatross were definitely the future when I saw them a few years ago. That show was inspiring. I AM THE LAZER VIKING is so perfect I still haven't listened to their newer stuff.

    DEP and ATR sounded like the future at one point, but they feel a little dated now.

    We're going to continue to mix genres from all eras. I love how music never dies. I just waits.

    Guitars, drums, synths and computers. Computers are practically indispensable, but having seen a handful of laptop bands, I have to say it's just an awful live show. Extreme music benefits too much from an active stage presence. I suspect it informs the process as well.
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      CommentAuthorJaredRules
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2008
     (775.12)
    there are laptop bands that know how to put on entertaining performance.
    YACHT for example. Though he's by no means "Extreme."
    His early stuff is pretty wild though.
  4.  (775.13)
    In terms of electronic music ,the access musicians have to an almost unlimited range of instruments and effects seems more a barrier to totally extreme and new ideas....far...maybe the next step in extremity is a return to a limited sound pallate and deliberate restriction of working methods. Burial , for example .

    Live performamce with laptops is always in danger of becoming a powerpoint presentation meeting , or the gig equivelent of someone hogging the Playstation. At least put the computer in a wicker basket or wrap it in meat for God's sake....
    • CommentAuthorDracko
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2008
     (775.14)
    I'm having a time out until I can learn some manners.
    Wait until noise music hits the mainstream consciousness. It will be glorious.
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      CommentAuthorVespers
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2008
     (775.15)
    You think it will? I think the mainstream will have to change a lot for it to accept noise.

    Currently, noise is what you put on at parties and go to hell for. Or you sit around, all three of you that like it, pointing out to everyone who sneaks back in for a drink how awesome it is.
    • CommentAuthor___________
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2008 edited
     (775.16)
    noiose will never make it into the mainstream, but it's filtering in to the production side. a lot of new music, for instance, is over compressed to the point of distortion - something to do with the target audience listening to music on their fucking phones through tiny speakers. the problem is the lack of dynamic range. evrything has to be LOUD. bastards. I liked the quiet, loud then really fecking loud bits that went quiet again.
  5.  (775.17)
    Scenes are evolving at the speed of light these days. New waves come and go so fast that it's hard to know what is going to stand the test of time.

    - omer333

    The whole extreme doom thing looked like it was going to be making big waves with bands like Sunn0))) getting exposure in mainstream magazines and UK acts like Electric Wizard garnering a big fan base. The whole thing looked poised to take over the world circa 2004 but for whatever reason it never really happened.

    - Dracko

    I can't really see noise as the next big thing. It's been around for far too long. How long have Whitehouse been around now? Or Boyd Rice? Or Merzbow? It's an old fucking scene.

    My feeling is that the next big thing will come swarming up out of the grindcore scene. That seems to be where the pretentious, arty people with a head full of rabid monkeys currently hang their hats. All those tiny little digital grind bands experimenting with every kind of weird permutation under the sun. No one cares at the moment because no one has quite got it right yet but I think they might.
    • CommentAuthorDracko
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2008 edited
     (775.18)
    I'm having a time out until I can learn some manners.
    It's an old scene, but now that hipsters are jumping onto Wolf Eyes and turning Japanese, it seems like it's coming nearer than I previously thought. The fact that it's leaking into production as some have put it is already encouraging.

    Of course, noise rock in itself is more likely to kick off in that respect. If and when it does, I wonder if it will follow with the seemingly inevitable neo-folk music that noise rock artists either come from or decide to become.

    Either way, maybe noise won't make it big, but I do not doubt that it will garner media attention, at the very least, quite soon.
  6.  (775.19)
    TRENCHER are the future of grind! casio grindcore... genius.
  7.  (775.20)
    - Dracko

    Maybe you're right, Noise Rock possibly has a future that pure Noise just doesn't have. I doubt Neo-Folk will be able to cross the chasm until it shakes itself of the far right associations. Being called a Nazi (rightly or wrongly) don't tend to do much for your music sales.

    - offtandiscord

    I saw Trencher a few years ago and they were fantastic. The sight of a bearded weirdo crouched over a milk crate, screaming and hammering out these tinny little riffs on a keyboard less than a foot long will stay with me forever.

    They're an extreme example of the kind of thing that I could see making the leap into mass awareness, extreme music that reacts against the po-faced. There's a bunch of electronic bands producing breakcore and gabba that incorporates 8-bit video game melodies produced using Gameboy technology. I can see something interesting and salable developing out of this melting pot of surreal ideas. There's nothing there yet that quite works but it does seem to be a scene where there's a lot of musicians looking for something new and different.

    I'll be interested to see if the new Ghengis Tron album makes waves. It's certainly being bigged up. If it does then that might point the way of the future.