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  1.  (7838.1)
    Got a question about the nuts and bolts of the visual arts? Need to know how to drybrush, or make a linoprint, or draw reflective surfaces, or crosshatch with a mapping pen? Ask it on this thread, and the database of knowledge that is Whitechapel will probably provide you with an answer.
  2.  (7838.2)
    Can someone put links up to Sizer's coloring tutorials here? I think that'd be useful.
    Paul?
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      CommentAuthorPaul Sizer
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2010
     (7838.3)
    Here's the most recent one I've done, with color line holds and such:


    Here's the link to download the full size, readable version
  3.  (7838.4)
    Thankyou :) That's the one I was thinking of!
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      CommentAuthorcosta_k
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2010
     (7838.5)
    Something I'm trying to work on is shadows/picking a light source direction so you can create contrasts. Recommendations?
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      CommentAuthorgroundxero
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2010
     (7838.6)
    What a great thread!

    I recently was offered the chance to to a CD cover for a band. I've never done an album cover before. I know for a comics and such some most artists draw larger and reduce the image to make it appear cleaner and reduce visible errors. Should I do the same for an album cover? If so, how large should I draw the image?
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      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2010
     (7838.7)
    groundxero - depends on how detailed you want the cover to be. You don't want to add in a bunch of really neat elements that will just end up being lost upon reduction.
  4.  (7838.8)
    @Costa - what kind of contrasts are you after? Do you want deep shaded recesses amongst brightly lighted facing walls? Long dark shadows trailing across a sunny meadow? Large backlit monoliths projecting heavily perspectived shadows toward the viewer?

    Here are a couple of my painted works; I'll give you the rundown on how I chose the lighting for each of them.

    1) This is a digital rough of an illustration for a friend's sci-fi novel pitch. The light source is off panel to the right, at about 45 degrees elevation, casting the alleyways between the foreground buildings into deep shadow and emphasising their height.

    photocal

    2) This is a more complex physical work. It relies on red-green contrast for its impact. The light source is to the right again, elevated to about 60 degrees to cast angled shadows down all front-facing surfaces and provide areas of deeper red to offset the many shades of green in the trees and grass. Most of the lawnmower engine is front-lit to highlight the detail work, with some unobtrusive cross-shadows to disguise the shift in lighting.

    lawnmower
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      CommentAuthorgroundxero
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2010 edited
     (7838.9)
    @Alan Tyson


    bioshock

    This is NOT what I'm using for the cover, but I'm planing on doing something similar. Very bold lines, black and white or just a few colors with no gradients. I want the image to be very bold and pop, so there probably won't be a lot of fine detail.
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      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2010
     (7838.10)
    Then you should probably be OK with working bigger. In fact, I'd recommend it!
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      CommentAuthorPaul Sizer
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2010
     (7838.11)
    @GroundZero:
    Industry standard rule of thumb for producing black and white line work for printed matter:
    At 100 % size that it will be reproduced, your black and white art should be a minimum of 600 dpi/preferably 1200 for bitmap art.
    If this is going to be a greyscale image, you can reduce the dpi down to 300 dpi at the 100% size.

    Bigger reduced down is ALWAYS the way to go. If this is something you are drawing by hand, I'd work at 200% size from the reproduction size.
  5.  (7838.12)
    Can I request a decent tutorial on drawing in perspective? Something other than boxes in worms eye/birds eye/whatever view? Like making people or complex shapes? Google has not been my friend on this.
  6.  (7838.13)
    Seconding the perspective tutorial. I'm a bit shaky on that myself, and can't find the references I had from highschool (!!!) for it.
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      CommentAuthorkperkins
    • CommentTimeMar 7th 2010 edited
     (7838.14)
    I uploaded a Famous Artist's Course perspective chapter to my blog.
    Perspective for Artists
    It's a PDF.
    Also download direct
    Also I recommend a book in that post, and Tommy Patterson recommended a video series (cost more, but looks quire thorough).
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      CommentAuthorPaul Sizer
    • CommentTimeMar 7th 2010
     (7838.15)
    Not exactly what you guys were asking for, but I thought I'd consolidate these all in one place, from previous examples I've made up on perspective.




    Sometimes it just helps to see the perspective built into a full composition to really see how it works in a practical way.
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      CommentAuthorgroundxero
    • CommentTimeMar 7th 2010
     (7838.16)
    @# Paul Sizer


    Thanks for the specifics! Also, your perspective examples are great. A often have problems with perspective and proportion.
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      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeMar 7th 2010
     (7838.17)
    Does anyone have any good sketching warm-ups/exercises for when you just can't get into The Groove? Not that you can't think of what to draw, but when you sit down to draw the lines just look brittle and disconnected and the like.
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      CommentAuthorPupato
    • CommentTimeMar 7th 2010 edited
     (7838.18)
    @Alan Tyson, i use to have naked women (2 or 3, no more) at the studio, for the warm-ups/exercises, but since they want celebrate orgies all the time, i´ve found this at the net :

    posemaniacs

    hope it helps you.

    @kperkins, thank you man, this perspective book is amazing : )

    @Sizer, your couloring tutorial made me a better artist, thank you master... (ahrg, i sound like Igor)
  7.  (7838.19)
    @Paul Sizer
    Those perspective tutorials really make everything click into place. One question - when you drew the scenes, did you draw out the perspective lines first, or are you master enough to just imagine them?
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      CommentAuthorPaul Sizer
    • CommentTimeMar 7th 2010
     (7838.20)
    Well, it depends. If I'm just winging it, I'll set up the perspective rulers (all of those examples show how MangaStudio makes perspective rulers, and why I fucking love it to death!) and find my drawings and scene based on the lines. I usually have a pretty good idea of what kind of a scene I'm going for (upshot, downshot, down a long corridor, etc.) and I go from there.

    I've done perspective stuff for so long that I can just see the lines from the vanishing points and start constructing stuff right from those. Even if I have a good idea, I lay in the lines and all the supplemental lines just to have a grid to play off of. Helps me out, especially with more complex scenes. Sometimes I'll just drop in some main shapes, then see what perspective they require, and construct my perspective grid from there.