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    • CommentAuthorMark W
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2008
     (802.1)
    I'm not a huge fan or most Warhammer 40k fiction, but by the God-Emperor, Dan Abnett's novels and comics work in that setting just grab me and will not let go while it alternates between making me smile and repeatedly hammering me in the gut. The only other thing 40k I've enjoyed as much is Ciaphias Cain, Hero of the Imperium and they should have just called that Commisar Blackadder.
  1.  (802.2)
    Have you read the DURHAM RED trilogy of graphic novels from 2000AD/Rebellion that Abnett wrote with Mark Harrison co-plotting and drawing in full CGI-photoshop hybrid art?
    • CommentAuthorFlabyo
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2008
     (802.3)
    The Eisenhorn collection is one of the few bits the black library have put out that could stand alone without the backstory. The more recent 'Ravenor' trilogy has been excellent as well. They have such a fantastic fictional setting with 40k that it annoys me when a good chunk of their attempts to exploit it fall flat.
  2.  (802.4)
    I'm surprised Boom Studios hasn't adapted any of the Abnett 40K novels.
    • CommentAuthorMark W
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2008
     (802.5)
    @AdiTantimedh

    I havent read any of the Durham Red stuff, though I've thought of getting some of that.

    @Kosmopolit

    It might just be that since Abnett himself is writing most of the 40K comics himself, he might not be interested in adapting his own works, or perhaps their license only lets them do new stuff and not adapt existing stories. I can definately recommend the trade of The Damnation Crusade.
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      CommentAuthorDrunkard
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2008
     (802.6)
    I'm not a huge fan of Abnett as far as 40K goes. While they include some interesting ideas many of the Gaunt's Ghosts novels degnerate into badly formatted teenage war porn. The less said about Double Eagle the better. Well, other than it was the most boring duplication of the Battle of Britain I have read to date.
  3.  (802.7)
    I liked the first Eisenhorn book then any of the other 40k books I've read, though I've only read a total of three and one half. The half being the second Eisenhorn book, which I never got around to finishing.
  4.  (802.8)
    Mark W - Caiphas Cain is cool. You have read Flashman though, right?

    I used to work for Games Workshop and I can remember the buzz there used to be in the store when a new Dan Abnett was due out. He's a writer with the rare ability to elevate trash without turning it into something else. He also gets everywhere.
    • CommentAuthorElohim
    • CommentTimeFeb 2nd 2008
     (802.9)
    Talking of man-crushes on military SF - anyone tried David Weber's Honor Harrington series? I'm not a fan of most of his stuff, but my copies of those books are among my most treasured possessions...
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      CommentAuthorDrunkard
    • CommentTimeFeb 2nd 2008
     (802.10)
    Honor Harrington certainly hits the spot. I edge towards the earlier novels rather than those later in the series due to my own dislike of carrier based tactics. Still, the one currently last in the series was a sure winner based on the carnage involved.
  5.  (802.11)
    Mark -

    You'd enjoy the DURHAM RED trilogy.
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      CommentAuthorGreg SBB!
    • CommentTimeFeb 2nd 2008
     (802.12)
    Abnett's never done anything for me, personally. But I suspect that's as much down to him never writing the kind of stuff I'm interested in, rather than any judgement on his proficiency.
    • CommentAuthorGuy
    • CommentTimeFeb 2nd 2008
     (802.13)
    Honor Harrington was good until the cats started getting everywhere. Bloody psychic cats.

    Personally I find Ian Watson's books stomp all over the other 40k books. Back when wargaming had balls. Abnett is very good at making fun trash though.
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      CommentAuthorVespers
    • CommentTimeFeb 2nd 2008
     (802.14)
    The best thing about 40k, personally, is the rulebook; more importantly, the images therein. My copy is in pride of place on top of my gaming-books stack. Also, it's good for thumping people over the head with.

    The Gaunt's Ghosts series (or more importantly, the characters) is a favorite of mine, too. They are what made me start getting obsessed with the Guard as well as Eldar.
    • CommentAuthorMark W
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2008
     (802.15)
    @Vespers
    oh hell yes, while there arent as many fluff sections in the newer rulebook as there were in older editions, its still one of the best places to get an overall feel for the setting, though these days I satify my 40K gaming jones with Dawn of War Multiplayer. If you can find them cheap, the codexes for 2nd ed 40K are also good sources of general background for the older races.
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      CommentAuthorVespers
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2008
     (802.16)
    Yeah, the book is lacking in fluff; However, someday when I have money and a decent supply of acid, I am going to make some etched steel plates to bind in it, carry it on a chain from my belt, and whack people over the head with it, leaving REPENT emblazoned on their foreheads.
    I believe I have at least one older edition as well. And the 2nd ed Eldar codex, which I got for 20 bucks off a guy at my school back in high school, and has some of the best Eldar fluff ever, from back before the recent editions completely fucked over Eldar and sent me over to the IG.

    Ooh, another good source for 40k stuff is the Inquisitor rulebook. That system is the best set in the universe for being true to the fluffy... overpoweredness of it all. You can make some truly bitchin charries and set them against each other in firefights to rival anything from the best action movies.
    • CommentAuthorGuy
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2008
     (802.17)
    Arrk, if you want fluff you need Rogue Trader (can usually be found of eBay for £15-20). Back from when twelve titted super-demons from another dimension with an arse for a face could chomp your merry imperialistic neo-Dune psychos. The current best hardback is for Infinity: solid, good binding and colours to blind people with. Practically impossible to damage the thing.
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      CommentAuthorAlastair
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2008
     (802.18)
    inquisitor and rogue trader yup!
    i'm still one of thse sad sacks whose wife puts up with me wargaming. i am only 22 though but i mostly collect the background books
    • CommentAuthorFlxzr
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2008
     (802.19)
    Probably my favourite 40K fiction book was the short story collection "Deathwing", edited by David Pringle of Interzone fame. The current (?) edition's got a bunch of new stories in it which David Pringle never saw, but it's still a good solid collection. The biggest names in it that I can see, apart from Dan Abnett, are Ian Watson, Storm Constantine and Charlie Stross. Back in the days when GW had real SF writers writing for them. :)

    Most of the other black library books I've read have been pretty dire, especially one by CS Goto, which was so bad it was just embarassing...
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      CommentAuthorDrunkard
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2008
     (802.20)
    Try not to touch anything by CS Goto unless you fully intend to scrap out and eat your own eyeballs afterwards. Rather than having an idea of the universe his stories are supposed to exist within he instead leaps in with both feet with expired narrative license in all directions.