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    • CommentAuthorKosmopolit
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2008 edited
     (809.1)
    Boy, I have mixed feelings about this.

    Masdar City is a massive plan to build a zero impact/zero emissions in the United Arab Emirates.

    On the one hand, it sounds like a fantastic visionary project: the city's power will come entirely from solar and wind technology. Water will be recycled. Private cars will be banned in favor of a comprehensive public transport system - no point in the city will be more than 200 metres from a bus stop or train station.

    It's also good to see that at least some of the Gulf states are waking up to the fact that their oil is running out and trying to establish a viable long-term future for themselves.

    On the other hand, it's the UAE.

    Will the so-called "Green University" opening next year admit women?

    Will the factories big-name western firms are lining up to build be staffed by guest workers working for minimal wages under slave-like conditions?

    The UAE's rulers seem intent on building a sustainable future for themselves but do we want absolute monarchy and the rest of the unpleasant baggage of the UAE to be sustainable?

    Why is it that the UAE and China (which has a similar project near shanghai called Dontang) seem to be moving ahead of the developed countries?
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      CommentAuthorFractal
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2008
     (809.2)
    Easy answer: Because it's easier to do things like that when you have absolute power.

    Hard answer: I'm not sure, actually. Maybe the UAE, which is built on oil, has a better sense of the fact that oil is going to run out than, say, Canada does?

This discussion has been inactive for longer than 5 days, and doesn't want to be resurrected.