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      CommentAuthorjeremiah
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2010
     (8102.1)
    I picked it up and read it for the first time, it was a little too inside baseball for me, I didn't know a lot of the comic/creators you referenced and some of the ones I did know of, I hadn't read much of their stuff. I will probably have to google/read a lot of that stuff then re-read it.... I enjoyed how a lot of the non-comics literature/music was tied into the narrative. I think it would have been cool/helpful if some of the pages and/or images from some of the comics you were talking about could be incorporated into the book so I could easily look over and see what you are talking about, but I realize the would be impossible for obvious reasons.
  1.  (8102.2)
    I didn't know a lot of the comic/creators you referenced and some of the ones I did know of, I hadn't read much of their stuff. I will probably have to google

    Kind of the point.
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      CommentAuthorparibolzi
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2010
     (8102.3)
    The book release has pushed me into rereading the online columns (can't pick up the printed version right now, as unexpected auto repair = the End of Disposable Income as We Know It), which makes me wonder; are you tracking to see if you get an uptick in traffic at Bleeding Cool? I'd be interested to know if news of the book hitting shelves drives people unable or unwilling to plunk down specie to the site.
    It's a thought that leads naturally to paranoia. OMG AVATAR N WARRENELLIS R WATCHING ME ON INTERNETS
  2.  (8102.4)
    OMG AVATAR N WARRENELLIS R WATCHING ME ON INTERNETS

    Count on it.
  3.  (8102.5)
    Should have my copy next week through my comic book shop, BSI Comics. I read the whole thing online as it came out, but want the book so I can read it with my Kirby book sitting by my bedside.
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      CommentAuthorstsparky
    • CommentTimeMay 25th 2010
     (8102.6)
    Hit an alternate shop - and bingo. It's better collected. Thanks for this.

    And you were right about the Gil Kane response I wrote. Oddest thing about Blackmark is how crisp it is even now. Can you eye which assistant did what? I think I see Neal Adam's inks in the throne scene ...
    • CommentAuthorFlabyo
    • CommentTimeMay 25th 2010
     (8102.7)
    Finally picked this up from the London Forbidden Planet at the weekend (been a while since I had a free weekend to go comic shopping, sucks that Guildford doesn't have a comics place anymore).

    For some reason it wasn't in their till system, so the shop got to hear someone asking over the tannoy system if anyone know how much 'Warren Ellis' Do Anything' costs... Hehe.

    Other than that I'd just be repeating what everyone else here has said, that the connections flow better in this form than as a weekly column, and that a wander around wikipedia is probably in my near future.

    Someone needs to write something like this about the history of videogames, all the gaming history stuff I've read tends to be really dry and full of the 'official' line. No sign of the actual people. Maybe it's just a little too early for gaming for that kind of writing.
  4.  (8102.8)
    For some reason it wasn't in their till system, so the shop got to hear someone asking over the tannoy system if anyone know how much 'Warren Ellis' Do Anything' costs... Hehe.


    hahahah
  5.  (8102.9)
    I have my comics picked up for me, as I live 70 miles from the nearest comic shop. I call my comic guy on Friday and get a total for my buddy who dates a girl in that town. I called today and my box contained Astonishing X-Men #35 and Gravel #20. I exclaimed "SWEET! Warren Ellis all the way!" and then he says: "Hey, I've got DO ANYTHING? You want that too?" At $6, couldn't pass it up. I lost track of it when it was serialized on the net after the first 2 or 3, even though I was enjoying it, especially for the copious cultural references. Looking forward to really exploring it in depth.

    Incidentally, my Comic Guy's official pitch: "Even if you're a fan of the guy [warren] already, your respect for him will only increase after reading this. I had no idea he was into so much shit and so knowledgeable. I see why you read so much of his stuff now."

    High praise indeed from those out in the trenches peddling the products of your craft.
  6.  (8102.10)
    woke up this morning and read the first 30 pages. haven't had breakfast yet, slightly starving, but can't stop reading. kaleidoscopic visions of floating Superman heads by John Lennon and R. Crumb are swirling and battling it out in my mind. I almost want to have a pint of porter for breakfast to intensify the info-dump disorientation of peering behind the veil and seeing the exposed innards of an industry that I've supported monetarily in exchange for a radically pop-mythologized foundation of art and literature (that has now come full circle as warren teaches me english history, the origins of frankenstein, and what would sherlock holmes do if he found out he was a fictional character...). The concept of the Jonbar Hinge, new to me, will now aid in any future attempts to explain Ignition City and why it is such a crucial read for anyone who has ever dreamed of space...

    This info-dense prose should be a model for a future in which, rather than a PC, a robot-head in every home, download your heroes (or villains) and engage in essential dialogs to suss out the true meaning of your attachments to one artform or historical entity/era, or style over another. the central conceit of the robot-head of jack kirby (as well as the... quantum narrative as we jump between points in space and time, all moments happening at once, forever entangled by these 48 pages) makes this much more of an interactive and participatory history lesson than it otherwise may have been. and of course, the pivot point of 1963 and the TARDIS [wvromp, wvromp, wvromping] through the narrative definitely makes this more of an adventure tale through the comics equivalent of the time vortex, with Warren Ellis as The Doctor (The Nth Doctor), and we, the reader, as the naive and ignorant companion visiting Planet Druillet or the Braxton Galactic Music System.

    (also, as a side note: the mention of Dan O'Neill, a new absolute favorite of mine, whose work I've only just discovered in Alan Moore's Dodgem Logic. When attempting to turn anyone on to the mag, I start with Dan's pinups. From issue #1, my mind has been turned inside out, exploded, and orgasmed entirely in the span of a single page.)

    big fan of the parentheticals. that one paragraph, in the Superman section, pg 27: "Comics weren't just about Superman (... ...) even then." YES. Thank you.
  7.  (8102.11)
    fuckin' hell. that was an intense ride. I especially loved the conclusion "...maybe, writing about comics can be music too." yeah. I think this book is really rather brilliant, at least as brilliant as half the things you wrote about in it. now I'm stuck trying to think of ways to make people read it. and, most importantly, now I'm inspired. I'm gonna go see if I can do anything.