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    • CommentAuthorales kot
    • CommentTimeJul 3rd 2010
     (8494.21)
    I don't see Wildstorm going anywhere for a long, long time. Two words: Movie adaptations.
    • CommentAuthorgzapata
    • CommentTimeJul 3rd 2010
     (8494.22)
    @ales kot- agreed though a bit saddening as Wildstorm was once the place to go for superheroes that lived in a world where things actually...happened. Still no clue when the change occurred from the best to it's present and confusing form.
  1.  (8494.23)
    The license for the movie adaptations ultimately comes out of DC's budget, so there's no argument for the imprint living any longer there.
    • CommentAuthorales kot
    • CommentTimeJul 3rd 2010 edited
     (8494.24)
    @Richard Pace:


    Looking at WildStorm as the third leg of the whole publishing section, over the past few years we've seen a real growth in licensed material there, starting with the video game stuff people seem so familiar with to projects like "Fringe" and "X-Files." Do you see that as the direction that imprint will continue to move in on the whole?

    Lee: There was a conscious decision years ago, as the DCU material became edgier and Vertigo started experimenting with things that felt more superhero-ish, WildStorm no longer occupied that middle ground. And as we were working on DC Universe Online, we saw an opportunity where DC was not involved in a lot of licensed books. We're seeing a lot of traction amongst comic book readers for that type of material. Some of the best-selling books of recent years have been some of these licensed books that WildStorm has developed and put out. When we did that "Heroes" trade, that was a huge seller for us, and it showed us the potential for when you find the kind of license that attracts the same kind of reader you have for comics of really scoring a home run and building a publishing business out of that. So we really pick up the licenses that we're fans of, and it's been a great opportunity to play with the stuff we enjoy as fans ourselves. So it's opened a lot of doors, and the successes have built upon themselves where we have people with very cool projects on their own coming to us and saying, "Can you make this a comic book?" It's been a positive direction for WildStorm, and we hope to continue with that.


    http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=26795
  2.  (8494.25)
    I don't see Wildstorm going anywhere for a long, long time. Two words: Movie adaptations.

    I understand that there are plans for redevelopment and more media tie-in books at Wildstorm.

    (On the other hand, China Mieville was deep into writing SWAMP THING when DC killed the book, and it cost them money to do that, so...)
    • CommentAuthorales kot
    • CommentTimeJul 3rd 2010
     (8494.26)
    @warrenellis:

    Do you have anything you can share regarding the situation at Vertigo? I don't mean Swamp Thing, but the overall picture.
  3.  (8494.27)
    Nothing I'd want to share, no. Also, I'm pretty distant from the whole thing.
  4.  (8494.28)
    If it becomes purely a licensing imprint, then there's no value in the Wildstorm brand since what it's publishing has no coherence to any other thing it publishes. Renaming it DC Media or some-such would be easy, expand the DC brand and few, if any, people would need to be let go. It's not there's any real effort required.

    As a purely licensed imprint it would be easier for retailers to know how to order the books, so it's savvy business, but it's a hollow shell that no longer contains the Wildstorm Universe titles or Homage creator-owned projects, making the name pointless.

    Not saying I want to see it fold, some great comics came out of there, but it's something I wouldn't be surprised to see happen based on recent history.
  5.  (8494.29)
    so there's no argument for the imprint living any longer there.

    As long as the imprint sells enough (*good*) comics it'll stay alive: brand recognition. Same with Vertigo I'd believe.

    (Don't listen to me, I know nooothing)
  6.  (8494.30)
    I think Wildstorm still has the value of getting the random passerby that was a comic reader in the
    90's that strolls into a shop to pick up their books not knowing it's now DC owned. I have some
    friends from high school that wouldn't touch anything with the DC bullet, but would probably
    pick up and flip through something with the Wildstorm logo.

    As for Zuda. I just finished my 8 pages. I'm not too sad, but I am pretty frustrated that
    I've now got 8 pages of my best work in a format that isn't really suitable to any publisher.
    The silver lining being that it looks damn fantastic on an iPad, and I'm sure we'll see ALL
    publishers looking to push more digitally exclusive content.
    •  
      CommentAuthorcosta_k
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2010
     (8494.31)
    I've found some great random surprises from Wildstorm, I think it's a great branch for one-off projects, "vanity" books and miniseries, continuing stuff like WILDCATS, etc.

    Also, if what senor Ellis is saying is true about doing tie-ins at Wildstorm, I guess that'd be like IDW's comic adaptations of IP's like their 30 DAYS OF NIGHT and GI JOE titles? I'd be down with that.
    • CommentAuthorales kot
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2010
     (8494.32)
    30 DAYS OF NIGHT / X-FILES crossover is already happening.
  7.  (8494.33)
    ZUDA update at Newsarama.

    Looks like a pretty classy manner of shutting things down, all things considered.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAdam Lucas
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2010 edited
     (8494.34)
    I made Goldilock for Zuda. Unfortunately it doesn't look like they're keeping any series that hadn't made it to the 40 page mark except for instant winners. I could be wrong but that seems to be the case. Goldilock did not make the cut. I have to admit i'm pretty disappointed. I've been thinking of nothing but Goldilock for the past 2 years. I was hoping to use it as a springboard into more work but the springboard just broke.

    If anything I'm thankful for the run I did get. A lot of series are being left behind that never got a chance to even start. At only 20 pages I already had over 100,000 views and was recieving some great feedback from fans and creators alike. I met some awesome people through Zuda and the community will be missed.

    Now I just have to decide to try and salvage Goldilock or try something else.

    I'll still be here reading FA!
    •  
      CommentAuthorSobreiro
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2010
     (8494.35)
    Goldilock is spectacular and personally I'll be reading it in any format you publish it in, Adam!
    •  
      CommentAuthorAdam Lucas
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2010 edited
     (8494.36)
    Thanks Sobreiro! Good luck to you too.

    For those that want to check out some of my art can do so here: http://konjur.deviantart.com/
    Or here: www.bathrobekimono.com
    and my twitter is @siradamlucas

    Ps: Luke is king.
  8.  (8494.37)
    The greatest thing about this thread is that I'm finding a lot of great artists and am starting to follow them on Twitter.

    I was never big on Zuda. The main thing is I always felt like everyone wasn't getting a fair shake...just not enough pages to make a truly great comic.

    Here's a similar question to one I asked in a standalone thread but never got any sort of response: What's to stop the fallen Zuda warriors from publishing their comics on the iPad? What does it take to publish a comic app on the iPad?

    I don't have an iPad, which is why I'm a little confused about the whole process. But here's a sample scenario, let me know where I'm missing pieces.

    Comic creator finds an iPad app developer. Creator pays app developer a small flat fee up front and a percentage of the money that's made from the app. Release the app for free and have the first issue of the comic included in the free app. Then, every month the creator would release a new "issue" that users could download from inside the app for $1 or however much he/she wants to charge.

    The app's price (free) would encourage people to at least give it a shot, and once they get interested in the first issue then they wouldn't mind paying $1 for every issue afterward...$1 isn't much of an investment, especially if you're getting a good story and artwork.

    So umm...can it be done like that or are there some technical limitations that I'm missing? I realize the hardest part about releasing an app is marketing it and getting people interested, but even still it seems like that sort of scenario would be very advantageous for comic creators.
    •  
      CommentAuthordavebaxter
    • CommentTimeJul 7th 2010
     (8494.38)
    Hey, everyone,

    Big news: we're putting together a major new alternative to ZUDA that's going to go farther than ZUDA ever did, and it should be ready and announced in the matter of a few weeks to a month. It's all coming through a new company called KILLING THE GRIZZLY (of which I'm a part) and we sent out our first big PR this morning, which you can read here:

    Comic Production and Promotion on a Whole New Level - http://eepurl.com/GZfz

    We're talking about the ability to fully fund a graphic work, find actual producers and/or crowd source fund, digital distribution through all viable channels, as well as Diamond distribution and bookstore distribution and the option to be agented to traditional publishers. It's not going to be a competition structure; it's purely talent based, insofar as something that borderline subjective can ever be the case. I'm going to start a thread here following the evolution of this, so please, come check it out. It's going to be awesome :D
  9.  (8494.39)
    @davebaxter

    I can't help but feel like your Zuda alternative sounds better now in theory then it will turn out in reality. The easiest way to sum up my feelings is this: If this thing is going to be so awesome, then why hasn't it been done by now?

    You don't go right out and say this but you make it sound like this thing is going to be as big as (or bigger than) Zuda. That's all well and good but I just...I don't know. I feel like some of the things you mentioned are very vague and, thus, can be open to interpretation and should have asterisks next to them.

    For example, you mention having the ability to "fully fund a graphic work" but there's no indication of the actual monetary amount. You mention that it's not a competition like Zuda but you don't say how works will be chosen. You mention "digital distribution through all viable channels", but do you really mean ALL DD channels, i.e. PC's, Macs, iPhones, iPads, Android devices, PSP's, etc. or is the word "viable" open to your company's interpretation.

    There aren't enough details about it right now, so I'll definitely admit that my initial reaction right now may turn out to be unfounded. I'll be interested to see how it turns out. I look forward to reading more about it on the dedicated thread.
    •  
      CommentAuthordavebaxter
    • CommentTimeJul 7th 2010
     (8494.40)
    @tcatsninfan - That's all normal as hell feelings to have. This day and age especially, there's a new "Changes Everything" concept every day, and wow, not much actually changes, does it?

    Do keep in mind though that I'm claiming this to be an ALTERNATIVE, not outright replacement to ZUDA, and I think that'll prove to be the case. Personally, I think out set-up will go well beyond what ZUDA did, and not be nearly so worrisome contractually. It's a very different beast but does plug the ZUDA hole (is that like a black hole?) currently being felt on the interwubs. Anywho, more info I just posted on the "DEATH OF ZUDA" thread. I'll post the final version of that info here when it's a bit more cemented.