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      CommentAuthorstsparky
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2010
     (8506.21)
    Andre? Everything improves with an established "Red Light District" - but kids will find a way around any silly barriers.
    • CommentAuthor256
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2010
     (8506.22)
    It gives me the feeling, unsure if it's accurate, that it'll make finding porn on the internet easier. Want porn? Go to http://www.[fetishname].xxx. Bam, porn.
    This is what I thought - but I expect that, if this shit takes off, you will be able to put ANY word in front of .xxx and end up at some sort of porn-conveyor...

    we’ll see right-wing extremist politicians around the world starting fights to force all porn sites (with no legal definition of porn, naturally) to .XXX
    Here's the thing... As far as I can see, having a porn-specific domain cannot help "protect the children" (there aren't enough inverted commas in the world for this stuff) unless all porn sites are compelled to use, and only use, a .xxx address. But I cannot even conceive of a way that one could compel a business of any sort to use a specific URL.

    I'd be fascinated to hear any precedent for it - even if it was pre-internet, in terms of making a business use a specific name/logo/copy - but I just can't think of one.
  1.  (8506.23)
    @John Skylar - why would someone want to register non-porn sites as .xxx? that seems like a pretty weak argument against having them.

    Loads of business buy up every possible domain because they’re convinced it protects their trademarks and keeps customers from being confused. That’s one reason the registrars push for more TLDs—every new TLD guarantees tens of thousands of registrations from people who might never even USE them.

    But I cannot even conceive of a way that one could compel a business of any sort to use a specific URL.

    Maybe not in the USA, but in just about any other nation the people running the business could be fined, jailed, etc..