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    •  
      CommentAuthorRixiM MixiR
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2010 edited
     (8600.1)
    •  
      CommentAuthorFauxhammer
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2010
     (8600.2)
    Christ almighty don't give the management any ideas! The last thing I need is a case of the cardiac eels.
    •  
      CommentAuthorcity creed
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2010
     (8600.3)
    there is no way I'm clicking that link until I've had a couple of stiff brandies.
    •  
      CommentAuthorjohnjones
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2010
     (8600.4)
    Good Lord, and I thought arse eels were bad. Yeesh!
    •  
      CommentAuthorsneak046
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2010
     (8600.5)
    The bit what worried me most was references to how the eels gained entry to the shark's body. Now obv. we don't have gills...
  1.  (8600.6)
    To humans, these are Very Scary Death Eels. Far worse than arse eels. They will make their own gills between our hoo-man ribcages. If management get wind, we're fucked!
  2.  (8600.7)
    AURGH.

    Creepy.
  3.  (8600.8)
    Hmm... After reading the article it seems the shark was more a target of opportunity rather than this being a regular parasitic relationship between two species. Which is only very small comfort. Ew.

    Top creepy parasite for me is still the fish-tongue parasite, although I'm sure someone who knows more about what insects get up to will be along shortly to creepy me out even worse.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSlick
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2010
     (8600.9)
    • CommentAuthorFlabyo
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2010 edited
     (8600.10)
    There's that fungus that infects the brains of ants and basically makes them go as high as they can up the trees and then explodes them in a shower of spores.

    It was on Attenboroughs 'Planet Earth'.
  4.  (8600.11)
    @ Flabyo

    I remember that. It was awesome.
    •  
      CommentAuthorcelan
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2010
     (8600.12)
    ^The fungus that attacks the ant is called Cordyceps. It is related to one that grows on caterpillars and is used in Chinese Medicine. (Dong Chong Xia Cao - lit. "Winter Bug, Summer Herb"). Works great for lung problems.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaprika
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2010
     (8600.13)
    oh man, heart worms.
    •  
      CommentAuthorD.J.
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2010
     (8600.14)
    Everything is terrible forever.
    • CommentAuthorVerissimus
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2010
     (8600.15)
    Oh no. Oh no.


    ...

    Oh no.
  5.  (8600.16)
    Dude, that's not even in the Top 20 weirdest parasitic relationships I've seen.

    Certainly interesting, though.
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2010
     (8600.17)
    Verus said,
    Oh no. Oh no.


    ...

    Oh no.


    I second this.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMikiM
    • CommentTimeAug 9th 2010
     (8600.18)
    Is it fucked that when I clicked on the heartworms link, the first thing I noticed was that the image on the wiki page looked like it had a smiling cow in the middle of it with its head at a 3/4 turn to the camera? :O

    smiling cow.
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      CommentAuthorFinagle
    • CommentTimeAug 9th 2010
     (8600.19)
    Oh, God. Now I see it, too. It *smiles*.
  6.  (8600.20)
    It looks a lot like the Laughing Cow from the cheese packets.