Not signed in (Sign In)
  1.  (8612.1)
    Does anyone know of a way to negate the gravitational pull of a planet??
    •  
      CommentAuthorjohnjones
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2010
     (8612.2)
    Get far enough away from it that the effects are negligible. If you're talking about true anti-gravity, then no. At least, not in practical terms.
  2.  (8612.3)
    Lots and lots of helium balloons.
  3.  (8612.4)
    I'm thinking in terms of an entire planet. So say you could move a planet beside ours. How could you negate the gravitational pull of that planet?
    •  
      CommentAuthorD.J.
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2010
     (8612.5)
    Fill everything on it with helium.
  4.  (8612.6)
    How could you negate the gravitational pull of that planet?

    One can’t actually negate a gravitational pull. Matter attracts matter, it’s just how the universe works. A gravitational pull can be avoided either by having so little mass as to be unaffected by gravity or moving with enough energy to overcome gravity.
    • CommentAuthorOddcult
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2010
     (8612.7)
    Last time I had to do something like that, I used an XT-87 Gravity Nullifier. There was some vibration, but I compensated with a weird magic stone thing I picked up from a shop in Glasgow.
  5.  (8612.8)
    Okay, so that is completely in the realm of science fiction and not science fact. Good to know. Thanks guys.
  6.  (8612.9)
    If you kept the planet moving at some speed so as to have both planets orbiting each other as they orbit another body, I could conceivably see it working. But then, I don't know shit about astrophysics.
    •  
      CommentAuthoroddbill
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2010
     (8612.10)
    Planets orbiting each other still affect each other gravitationally.
  7.  (8612.11)
    Gravity is the weakest force of nature, yet the hardest to overcome...
  8.  (8612.12)
    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/13/science/13gravity.html?_r=1

    A theory that describes gravity as a side-product of a separate force entirely, which leads nicely to the thought that, if the underlying principle is better understood, the effect can be controlled. I'm not 100% clear on the theory but it could be fun to play with.
  9.  (8612.13)
    What I'm thinking now is given that gravity seems to occur around large groups of matter, is this what propels objects through space? In a vacuum in space with no large bodies of matter around, is there a place without gravity??
  10.  (8612.14)
    Does all matter have a gravitational force? If I were left in a vacuum in space, would I start to attract smaller bodies to myself?
  11.  (8612.15)
    Theoretically, I suppose that there could be spots that are far enough away from anything to be unaffected by gravity...

    ...but it'd be useless, because as soon as something moved toward them, hey presto, gravity field comes with it. Gravity's pull is, as far as we know, a fundamental principle of matter -- everything has a gravatic pull.
  12.  (8612.16)
    Okay so if the universe is expanding due to the big bang, and it is theorized that there will one day be a big crunch, does that make the center of the universe a place of pure gravitational force? So many questions, so few answers.
    •  
      CommentAuthoroddbill
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2010
     (8612.17)
  13.  (8612.18)
    Okay so if the universe is expanding due to the big bang, and it is theorized that there will one day be a big crunch, does that make the center of the universe a place of pure gravitational force? So many questions, so few answers.


    There is a lot inside this question. First of all, the "Big Crunch" theory is probably not going to happen. It is more likely that the universe will end with a whimper than a bang; there just isn't enough matter that we know of to produce the high gravity required to collapse the universe.

    The second thing is that the "center" of the universe is a pretty hard concept. It's not totally clear where it all came from. Most objects in the universe appear to be moving away from us; does that make us the center? Probably not. Furthermore, you can't have an area of "pure gravitational force." Matter's presence in the spacetime field creates gravity via a method we are not totally sure of. There's no gravity without matter.

    Lastly, there IS a very strange thing, called the Great Attractor, which appears to be affecting the movement of a lot of the galaxies we can see (including our own!). We don't know what it is or how it got there, and it's one of the truly great mysteries of astrophysics.
  14.  (8612.19)
    Maybe if you become a scientologist it'll negate the gravity?
  15.  (8612.20)
    Seeing as our perspective on the universe is skewed by it being bigger than light can travel to us during its existence, "center" doesn't seem like it's a concept we can apply to it. For all intents and purposes, I am the center of the universe. From your perspective, so are you. :)