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    • CommentAuthorThe Johaan
    • CommentTimeAug 25th 2010
     (8807.1)
    Hey, first time poster here. I've convinced a non-comics reader that he should give the Global Frequency a try... but I don't think the first issue would really blow him away.

    So in the opinion of Whitechapel, what is the best/most accessible issue of GF, and why?

    I'm leaning towards the issues that show more of what the GF as a network of intelligent people are capable of, such as when Miranda Zero was kidnapped.
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      CommentAuthoroldhat
    • CommentTimeAug 25th 2010
     (8807.2)
    Why go issues? Get your friend the first trade.
    • CommentAuthorThe Johaan
    • CommentTimeAug 25th 2010
     (8807.3)
    If he likes the issue I give him, the next step would be convincing him to get the first trade. But he's reluctant to read it, so I need a pitch perfect comic book to loan him.
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      CommentAuthorreosarevok
    • CommentTimeAug 25th 2010
     (8807.4)
    I'd say my favourite is issue... ¿6?, well, the London parkour one. But as all are quite different, I don't know if this "if you like one you'll like the rest" thing will work...
    • CommentAuthorMike Carey
    • CommentTimeAug 25th 2010 edited
     (8807.5)
    The first issue is not considered representative of the series? That, with the issues set in Iceland and Japan, are my favorites, and the first issue would be my first recommendation. That, and the one with the Frenchman, the biofeedback nut.
    • CommentAuthoricelandbob
    • CommentTimeAug 25th 2010
     (8807.6)
    get the first trade?? Fuck that.

    Get you friend BOTH!
    • CommentAuthorJECole
    • CommentTimeAug 25th 2010
     (8807.7)
    I would say the the Gene Ha, John J Muth and Lee Bermejo illustrated issues were my favourite issues.
    Then then I was hooked from issue one.
    Patiently waiting for season two.
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      CommentAuthorDmitri
    • CommentTimeAug 25th 2010
     (8807.8)
    Issues five and six are my two personal faves out of the single issues. Five, almost purely for Crowley (And yes, I'd love to see a series with that for a main character) and six for the incredible pacing of both storytelling and art.
  1.  (8807.9)
    If you can't think of a good self-contained issue then a better intro to the series for a skeptic would be... Something else. Usually we don't realize how even our favorite individual examples of a larger work or genre we like owe their lofty regard to our broader appreciation for the whole series or author.

    If there is an Ellis work you think more compactly winning to newcomers than I think thatbwould probably make a more winning argument for a related long series that you're reluctant to pick a single issue from, because then your friend would trust your recommendation for Global Frequency anyway. Or this advice would not be better; depends on the person.

    As far as a compact intro to Ellis, I would more quickly think of Fell. After all it was designed for non-contextual consumption.

    Really though, trades or GNs are more frequently successful gateway drugs for comics. There are a lot of works that manage super well at sustained addictive page-turning and I don't imagine it's often the case that you can beat a book like Scott Pilgram, or I.M. Extremis, or Preacher vol 2, or hybrid entries like Logic Comics, depending on the person, for an intro to the genre.
  2.  (8807.10)
    The Jon J Muth issue in Norway is by far the most ambitious and successful GF story, imo.
  3.  (8807.11)
    Really tough question. Issue 1 was intended to be as full an introduction to the series as possible -- I must've rewritten that script four times before eventually releasing it to Garry, and there were also some nerves involved since the script was going to Garry fucking Leach, possibly my favourite British comics artist of the 80s based solely on his MARVELMAN pages.

    Although getting to write for Jon J Muth was genuinely terrifying.
  4.  (8807.12)
    I was going to say the one in Japan and the one in Iceland, but uh, MIKE CAREY beat me to it.

    Seriously. Great fucking comics. And the first issue is still fucking dynamite.
    get the first trade?? Fuck that.

    Get you friend BOTH!
    Yeah, seriously. Not like it was a long series or anything.
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      CommentAuthorExploder
    • CommentTimeAug 30th 2010
     (8807.13)
    Well, that series hit every possible note that it could in the time it had. Take your friend's favorite television show or movie or band and I'm sure you can find an issue that will immediately click with them. It's been too long since I've read them but I recall really enjoying the parkour/bomb issue and the issue where the cult releases its demands to the internet but nobody goes to their website and therefore it's up to the Global Frequency to send in a hit squad. I'd have to dig them out to get the numbers but you've probably got the resources to figure those out.
    • CommentAuthorOddcult
    • CommentTimeAug 30th 2010
     (8807.14)
    I like the one where they find out the names and addresses of people who are mean to cats.
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      CommentAuthorruzkin
    • CommentTimeAug 30th 2010
     (8807.15)
    I personally feel Issue 2 was the perfect introduction to the series, and the idea of the GF as a whole. Ish 4, on the other hand, quickly convinced me that Warren has never actually met an Australian.
    • CommentAuthorjustineger
    • CommentTimeAug 30th 2010
     (8807.16)
    I bought the first trade for the London issue featuring Parkour, as I was very interested in the subject at the time, but individual stories appeal to me at different times. That said, the Australian internet cult, Lee-Bermejo-draws-Japan, and the Frenchman issues remain stand-out selections.

    To be different, however, I would recommend the last issue. It encompasses the "response to global level threat" subject matter very well, and brings characters from most of the other issues into play. Therefore, if your friend likes it, but is still on the fence, you can point out that each of these individual characters has a backstory, and can try to hook 'em that way.
    • CommentAuthorVerissimus
    • CommentTimeAug 30th 2010
     (8807.17)
    I loved #3 the most. The alien memetic attack. I thought the idea was great, and the sweet Steve Dillon pictures were icing on the cake.
  5.  (8807.18)
    I personally feel Issue 2 was the perfect introduction to the series, and the idea of the GF as a whole. Ish 4, on the other hand, quickly convinced me that Warren has never actually met an Australian.

    Sadly, there are a couple of lines in there that I took directly from conversations overheard and otherwise during time spent in Melbourne.
  6.  (8807.19)
    as i have stated multiple times, #2 is probably my favorite single comic ever. the pacing hit just perfect for me so that by the time it gets on to where its getting the tension was just fucking excruciating. it was fucked up in a way that stuck with me for days.
    •  
      CommentAuthorruzkin
    • CommentTimeAug 30th 2010
     (8807.20)
    Sadly, there are a couple of lines in there that I took directly from conversations overheard and otherwise during time spent in Melbourne.

    In which case, I have to apologise for how my country can still sometimes be stuck in the 19th century. Last person I ever heard use the word "Abo" was my appallingly racist grandfather, and even he wouldn't dare say it outside his own house.

    Back on topic, I don't think you're going to get a consensus on the "best" issue of GF, but you can introduce your friend by tailoring their introductory issue to their tastes. Ish 5 reads like a mature, soft-spoken episode of oldschool X-Files, Ish 2 is a fantastic action-heavy story with a human centre, Ish 6 is the best depiction of parkour I've ever seen in a comic... so what do they already read?