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  1.  (9246.21)
    Found it.

    ...Jesus H. Morrigan, Ellis. Way to knock that one out of the park. Depressing as hell, though.
  2.  (9246.22)
    Warren has given me nightmares. Again.
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      CommentAuthortexture
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2010
     (9246.23)
    Really enjoyed the scope and scale of this one. Managed to be a very serious discussion of ecophagy, a ridiculous giant monster battle, and an iconoclastic refutation of statehood and religion, all at the same time. A mad, psychedelic apocalypse. I thought the way that events slipped from human control so quickly was powerful and realistic. Probably one of the scariest 'post-human' stories I have ever read. Would have commented earlier but the snow meant my LCS only just got this. Seeing as everyone else is comparing them... I thought 'Black Summer' was the strongest of the three... But 'Supergod' had its own particular charm. Also, Cthulhu appearance = win.
  3.  (9246.24)
    Jesus that was depressing but pretty damn great.
    • CommentAuthorKen Miller
    • CommentTimeDec 12th 2010
     (9246.25)
    Very good stuff (spoilers) and, as a Brit, I was secretly happy that the British Fungus God kinda won out in the end - even if we humans lost. I like the fact that Morrigan Lugus became a supermassive mycelial network - kinda like the real giant fungus in Utah.
    • CommentAuthormouton
    • CommentTimeDec 13th 2010
     (9246.26)
    The timelines that he found boring were probably all the happy hindu utopia ones. So he eliminated that possibility. Asshole.
    • CommentAuthorShadow Age
    • CommentTimeDec 13th 2010
     (9246.27)
    After thinking about it for a few weeks I think the only timeline that isn't boring is one in which Morrigan Lugus doesn't win. Think about it- if you're a god why would you want to hang out with a bunch of dead mushroom people?

    Two questions still bug the hell out of me!

    First, if Krishna could create matter faster than Malak could destroy it could he not have created a shield before being ripped apart by Dajjal's exploding power core?

    Second, if the trio of astronauts is really still alive inside Morrigan Lugus, somehow, what happens when they absorb their family and friends? Could Morrigan Lugus' personality change?
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      CommentAuthorjohnjones
    • CommentTimeDec 14th 2010 edited
     (9246.28)
    After thinking about it for a few weeks I think the only timeline that isn't boring is one in which Morrigan Lugus doesn't win. Think about it- if you're a god why would you want to hang out with a bunch of dead mushroom people?


    In my view, the only "non-boring" timeline is one in which Krishna no longer exists. Based on the developments toward the middle of issue 5, it seemed clear that Krishna was going to create a full-on peace-on-earth, goodwill-toward-men paradise on earth. And Paradise, to something like Dajjal, would be extremely dull. Also, what makes you so sure that all those people are completely dead? Maybe they're still alive within the mushroom network. Alive and screaming...

    First, if Krishna could create matter faster than Malak could destroy it could he not have created a shield before being ripped apart by Dajjal's exploding power core?


    He probably could have, if he'd had a few more picoseconds in which to act. Alas, he did not.

    Second, if the trio of astronauts is really still alive inside Morrigan Lugus, somehow, what happens when they absorb their family and friends? Could Morrigan Lugus' personality change?


    For answers to these and other burning questions, stay tuned for Ellis Warren's Supergod II, coming soon to a parallel dimension near you...
  4.  (9246.29)
    First, if Krishna could create matter faster than Malak could destroy it could he not have created a shield before being ripped apart by Dajjal's exploding power core?

    Apparently not.

    Second, if the trio of astronauts is really still alive inside Morrigan Lugus, somehow, what happens when they absorb their family and friends? Could Morrigan Lugus' personality change?

    Big If there.
  5.  (9246.30)
    I think the key is that Dajjal knows it will work, as he sees the whole spectrum of possibility before him.

    The outcome of the meeting between Krisha and Jerry was totally unexpected, threw me for quite a loop, and I have to say, I loved it. Jerry's "life" looks like a nightmare from the moment he's introduced.
    • CommentAuthoricelandbob
    • CommentTimeDec 14th 2010
     (9246.31)
    i finished reading that last chapter last night.

    It filled me with a mixture of sadness, bleakness, depression and a slow shiver down my spine at mankind's general futility of purpose. Lovely feelings i'M sure....

    IMO the gods who came out the worst out of this were the so called "New Gods" i.e. Jerry Craven (evangelical Christianity) and that Russian machine guy (stalinist capitalism) as they were totally outclassed by the real "old" gods of Krishna, Malak, Morrigan Lugus. They seemed to be limited by the complete lack of scope and imagination of their creators.

    Overall i think this is one of Warrens best limited series work he's done in years. The scope of ideas, the art, the total lack of sentimentality regarding "oh the humans will find a way to get out of this" ending in most comics was both refreshing and downright scary....
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      CommentAuthorDarthmoga
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2010
     (9246.32)
    While I was flipping through the preview, I noticed the depiction of Islamabad... which isn't exactly structured that way lol. Just minor peeve from your resident Islamabadi.
    You coulda asked me to take some pictures for you, warren.

    Looking forward to actually reading this in a month or two.

    somewhat related
  6.  (9246.33)
    "You coulda asked me to take some pictures for you, warren."

    I hate to break this to you, but I don't draw the comics.
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      CommentAuthorDarthmoga
    • CommentTimeJan 2nd 2011
     (9246.34)
    True enough.

    I'm here for whenever you need reference for Pakistan. I even have reference if you want to depict its destruction. Cheers.
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      CommentAuthornigredo
    • CommentTimeJan 5th 2011
     (9246.35)
  7.  (9246.36)
    Just reread Supergod and it hangs together better than I'd remembered. The ending isn't unnecessarily nihilistic (as some reviews had it), but pretty on-target for the point of the comic.

    With the Planetary and Transmetropolitan critical books (coming) out, I can't help but wonder if there's more mileage in letting people use the Black Summer/No Hero/Supergod alternate-perspectives (or however you'd call it) as an excuse to run off the rails with extrapolation, interpolation and thoughts on the subjects they raise and knock about. Anthology of people talking about the ideas or executions at their personal preference, or just one dense essay, not to say again what the comics said or considered or alluded to, but to extend the conversation.

    Not exactly gonna have the media-tie-in power of the Transmet book, though, I figure.