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      CommentAuthorFoamhead
    • CommentTimeMay 6th 2011
     (9827.101)
  1.  (9827.102)

    Take a classical instrument that's been around for centuries, fuck it sideways with randomness and Tics Tacs, and improvise something new and strange and awesome.

    Diggin' it.
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeMay 6th 2011
     (9827.103)
    •  
      CommentAuthorFoamhead
    • CommentTimeMay 6th 2011
     (9827.104)
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeMay 6th 2011
     (9827.105)
    AHHHHHHH!
    •  
      CommentAuthorSobreiro
    • CommentTimeMay 6th 2011
     (9827.106)
    Obamp!
    •  
      CommentAuthorBeamish
    • CommentTimeMay 6th 2011 edited
     (9827.107)
    Start watching @ 10 seconds to avoid the ad.

    Kittens in Bubbles

    How do you post videos without the box underneath the video.
  2.  (9827.108)
    I don't know but putting text in the box is the only way someone on iOS knows what's supposed to be in the video besides the still, so I usually use the box when putting stuff here.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSobreiro
    • CommentTimeMay 6th 2011
     (9827.109)
    Neil vs the Bully
  3.  (9827.110)
    @Sobriero - that's fucking hilarious. I bet Neil gets a laugh when he sees it.
    • CommentAuthorWood
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2011
     (9827.111)
    Ipad manufacturer Foxconn forced the employees in his Chinese facilities to sign a "no suicide" pledge after 14 of them killed themselves over the last 16 months.

    The revelation is the latest in a series of findings about the treatment of workers at Foxconn plants, where staff often work six 12-hour shifts a week, 98 hours of overtime in a month, and live in dormitories that look and feel like prison blocks.


    One worker spoke of how the factories had to keep pumping out the iPad around the clock, so much so that staff were required to work seven day weeks, as much as 12 hours more a week over Apple's own code of conduct for maximum work hours, which is set at 60 hours a week.

    Foxconn has denied that the insane hours were to blame for the suicides, with one cruel executive even going as far as to say that some victims were attempting to get compensation for loved ones.


    So what else will they do they do to stop these suicides ? Improve work conditions ? Raise wages ?

    After intense international media scrutiny and investigations, Foxconn attempted to end the spate of suicides with the introduction of nets around dormitory buildings and bans on equipment like hairdryers and kettles that might be used in a suicide attempt. The company even brought in monks to exorcise evil spirits which they believed led to the suicides, instead of addressing the paltry working conditions that were really to blame.


    Now, you can't accuse them of not dealing with the problem, can you ?
    •  
      CommentAuthorsneak046
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2011 edited
     (9827.112)
    •  
      CommentAuthorsneak046
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2011
     (9827.113)
    Just a quick aside re: @Wood's post above, are all these plants in China that manufacture components for apple any diferent than those that manufacture componants for say, hewlett packard etc?

    Note, I do not own *any* Apple products, but I am genuinly interested to find out if there is any evidence that Apple's manufacturing suppliers/partners are any worse (or indeed any better) than what is standard for the industry.

    The industry I work in relies heavily on processing carried out in Chinese plants, and in recent years there has been an industry lead effort to regulate for Health and Safety and Environmental improvements/auditing - mainly as a move to counter any chance of Gov regulating in this area (being shown to be keping our own house in order is the best method of avoiding falling into strict regulation.

    Sony produce 'green' phones - using recycled plastics etc, I am wondering if any electronics company would see the benefit in producing 'ethical electronics'. Hells, even 'fair-trade' electronics...

    Whitechapel - would you be willing to pay more for electronics that were produced more ethically (for what it's worth, I probably would if the margin wasn't any greater than say, 15%)?
    •  
      CommentAuthorFoamhead
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2011 edited
     (9827.114)
    And a very good Saturday morning to you all. Here's a little light entertainment to start your weekend.

    (Has this been posted before? I remember seeing a couple of Adam Curtis clips here before but not this one. Ah well, feel free to gimme a slap if it's a repeat.)

    A Film about how all of us have become Richard Nixon
  4.  (9827.115)
    @sneak046:

    Now, I'm not in China so I can't talk about it directly, but I worked for a Taiwanese-owned lcd monitor/tv company that outsourced part of its production to Poland (production of panels due to cost of transport and risk of damage and overall assembly for tax reasons, transport of parts being cheaper than transport of assembled sets and shorter turnaround times between orders and their completion for European markets etc.) and so on.
    While our situation was not as extreme...
    1. We did have 12 hour shifts that lead to massive overtime (20 hours a week + sometimes working Saturdays) whenever the number of orders grew.
    2. Whenever the number of orders dropped, massive amounts of people were sacked.
    3. Talking at work was discouraged and sitting on the job was absolutely forbidden (unless the station you worked at required for you to sit) even if the production was standing in place and you were just standing there, doing nothing for hours.
    4. Daily targets were absolutely batshit insane. 1000-1500 sets assembled a day (depending on their size). That meant, any slip ups and we were running behind which meant goodbye bonuses for hitting the target. And even if you did hit it, if the "Frequency of Repair" went above 1% (meaning 1 set per 100 was faulty and it often went up to 5% even) meant no bonus either.
    5. Depending on the leader you worked at often underperforming workers were pretty much verbally abused. Mostly because some leaders simply couldn't deal with the load of stress heaped upon their head bythe fact that they had to keep their area organized and were responsible for keeping the production running or it would be their heads flying. In fact, I saw a leader quit because he couldn't take it anymore (the last week before that he snapping back at everyone who made a tiniest mistake).
    I don't know if it helps or answers any questions at all, but at least I get to rant one more time about that, haha
    •  
      CommentAuthorsneak046
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2011 edited
     (9827.116)
    @Aurora Borealis

    They all sound like totally antiquated, backward and probably counter-productive working practises. And targets which were clearly designed to be unobtainable. Rant Away.

    For what it's worth, the production workers at the company I work for (not in electronics industry) are expected to be working at near full-speed all shift, and are standing up - but it's a physically demanding job that a certain type of person thrives on - and we try to treat the guys fairly - work hard for us and we'll look after you.....

    ....But I still believe in the workers owning the means of production.


    [edited to add "I work for" ]
    •  
      CommentAuthorFoamhead
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2011
     (9827.117)
    • CommentAuthorFlabyo
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2011
     (9827.118)
    Foxconn build components for all sorts of companies, not just Apple. But saying 'iPad manufacturer' carries more press weight than 'maker of DVD players and games consoles'.

    I *think* MS stopped using them for XBox 360 parts once the original story broke though.
    •  
      CommentAuthorGreasemonkey
    • CommentTimeMay 7th 2011 edited
     (9827.119)
    Pop history #14.

    1984: Pro wrestler David Schultz delights TV audiences by giving annoying 20/20 reporter John Stossel a smack around the head

  5.  (9827.120)