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      CommentAuthorallana
    • CommentTimeJul 3rd 2011
     (9915.81)
    if you can't take a joke

    DSC_7502
  1.  (9915.82)
    lens from my now deceased prewar rolleicord (it got knocked off a table, leaf shutter is jammed, spent five hours trying to figure out how to disassemble it, failed miserably). taken using the back lens element as a macro adapter on my old sony digital.
    Photobucket
    Photobucket
    and sunglasses, up close:
    Photobucket
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      CommentAuthoroldhat
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2011
     (9915.83)

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      CommentAuthorallana
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2011
     (9915.84)
    DSC_6346

    DSC_6342
  2.  (9915.85)
    Me fannying around in the woods near where I live. Sorry if a bit big.

    woods
    branches
    yew tree
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      CommentAuthorBeamish
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2011
     (9915.86)
    @thefoggylogs and I have a new desktop background. Hope you don't mind.
  3.  (9915.87)
    I got a new camera over the weekend, tried it out on Tuesday, 34 photos later, here's the only two I feel like sharing:
    Bondi

    Bondi
    Bondi Beach at 6:20 or 6:30 in the morning, an ungodly hour in any event. Surprising amount of people up and about though
    • CommentAuthorBankara
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2011
     (9915.88)
    FUCK, I am locked out of my yahoo account for some reason and I cannot post! Someone has changed my passwords and security questions so I am double fucked and I cannot seem to get an answer out of Yahoo. And this is why I hate the fact that my favorite photo sharing service was bought by an incompetent web portal who insist that I roll all of my services into one. Fuck you, Yahoo.

    (long winded explanation for why I am sitting this round out)
  4.  (9915.89)
    @Beamish I don't mind in the slightest. Quite a compliment.
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      CommentAuthorallana
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2011
     (9915.90)
    i hate hula hoops

    DSC_7720

    DSC_7701
  5.  (9915.91)
    Tried to go up Boney Mountain again on the 4th. Didn't get to the top, but got much closer:



    Question for the more experienced photogs: Is the richness of the colour generally a function of aperture, or is it something else I'm missing? Because the exact same picture taken with my phone has much better colours, and I'm a bit confused. The EXIF data is not being helpful in pinpointing differences, either.
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      CommentAuthorphotomagex
    • CommentTimeJul 7th 2011
     (9915.92)
    @ joanneleah - what a great photo, the subject, the pose, the colour, the depth of field, everything about it is stunning.
  6.  (9915.93)
    Is the richness of the colour generally a function of aperture, or is it something else I'm missing?


    1. For film, it's all about the chemicals that create the image on the strip. Some are more vivid than others. Some are more accurate than others. Some are in monochrome.

    2. For digital, it's all about the settings. Some will work better than others depending upon the lighting and atmosphere conditions. And some chips are barely there.

    3. Filters can help you compensate for most of the above,

    4. Your brain does most of your seeing for you. It comes with built in filters, light level toggles, and auto white balance. That whole system can't always be trusted.

    5. Sometimes your lens shifts color or distorts light. You can't trust anything in photography. Strange men with Leicas and a fondness for escalators even less so.

    The dirty secret of photography is that you're faking it most of the time, and hiding what you couldn't fake. If you're not enhancing reality with special films, digital settings, lens filters, lights, reflectors, make up, body paint, Vaseline, airbrushes or Photoshop you're going to be spending a lot of time going, "Jeeze. I really suck. Photographer X is always putting out such great images and I'm not..."

    What I'm saying is: Don't be ashamed to tweak things in post. Ansel Adams tweaked everything he did in the darkroom and he's the most famous rock photographer in the world. If it was good enough for him, it's good enough for the rest of us.
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      CommentAuthorjoanneleah
    • CommentTimeJul 7th 2011
     (9915.94)
    aftertaste
    • CommentAuthorBankara
    • CommentTimeJul 7th 2011
     (9915.95)
    Solid advice, Mister George nails it. Fake it til you make it is the name of the game and there is no small amount of posturing that you need to adopt to convince people that you are worth paying to take photos.
    Though I do a lot of work in camera to get as close to what I want I end up processing everything. Nothing looks amazing right out of the camera, that is the dirty secret that makes a pro's photos looks better and different. Photoshop layers. Learn to use the curves with masking layers and you will be able to have total control over exposure for every part of your image.
    What you say about Ansel Adams is true but to say that he tweaked his images in the darkroom does not do justice to the insane level of control he exerted over his images. He invented the Zone system of photography to get those rich images, his time in the darkroom was an extension of taking the photograph. When you shoot Zone you have to calculate for exposure in every part of your image and place all the elements into the 11 Zones ranging from pure back to pure white. This negative then requires special darkroom techniques to bring the photograph to completion. He also took ridiculously long exposures with a large format box camera mounted to the back of his pickup truck. He would open the shutter when he saw light he liked falling on his subject and close it when the light was just kind of blah. Some of his exposures are hours long. He was a mad bastard and brilliant and his photographs essentially validated the work of the conservation movement in the eyes of the public.
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      CommentAuthoroldhat
    • CommentTimeJul 7th 2011
     (9915.96)
    Oh god yeah, faking it. I get paid to take photos a lot and I still feel like I've succeeded in fooling everyone in to thinking I'm a competent photographer who knows what she's doing.
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      CommentAuthorallana
    • CommentTimeJul 7th 2011
     (9915.97)
    i used to play around with Photoshop a whole bunch, but i'm not very good at it. everything i've taken since April, roughly since i got a new lens, has been processing-free, and i'm pretty happy with the results. i'm no pro, but i think i'm taking better photos - but i've had better subjects, too.

    my problem is that once the photos come out of the camera, i'm at a loss as to how to make them look any better than they do. i don't have an established aesthetic like, say, Robin does, so when i Photoshop it ends up just looking inconsistent. i wish someone would take my photos and show me what they could look like.... *ahem*
    also i'd love to see some people's before/during/during/during/after work. if anyone would be so kind. :)
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      CommentAuthoroldhat
    • CommentTimeJul 7th 2011 edited
     (9915.98)
    I have an established aesthetic now? I genuinely don't notice these things until people point them out.

    For what it's worth Allana, I'm in love with your shots. The portraits are wonderful and the last shots just...well, they show summer very well, if that makes sense.
    • CommentAuthorBankara
    • CommentTimeJul 7th 2011
     (9915.99)
    I agree w/ Ms. LeBlanc here, your shots look great and have their own style. You don't need photoshop to develop a 'look' of your own, what your eye naturally gravitates towards becomes your 'look'. And it evolves, and gets better. Inconsistency is evidence that you are experimenting and learning. Embrace it and just go nuts shooting.

    That said, I do 90% of my work in Adobe Lightroom and I use a crapload of different creative presets (my favorites are the film emulators I picked up at presetsheaven.com for free that let me mimic the look of fuji, ilford, agfa, and kodak films including Kodachrome). I only use Photoshop for the real heavy lifting such as editing elements in or out, color balancing, perspective correction, sharpening, and print. I make extensive use of curves adjustment layers and masks to tweak elements individually for brightness and contrast and color. I do a lot of work on small details to get the thing the way I want and I try not to make it look like I have messed with it.

    I am happy to share tricks, it is my firm belief that all photographers should share resources and ideas. I am in the midst of a massive edit underway since noon and rambling here has actually been kind of good for thinking about my workflow. Just cracked the first beer of the day, it isn't the beer of victory yet but it is one closer. OK, back into the mines...
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      CommentAuthordiello
    • CommentTimeJul 7th 2011
     (9915.100)
    Mind if I have a go? I took this at a little photo shoot among friends at a mini-golf place a couple weeks ago: